Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Making Science Policy: The Real World

    Course No.
    STS 4451
    Instructor
    C. Leuenberger
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This course focuses on what happens when science meet the policy-making world. We will discuss theoretical and empirical studies in Science & Technology Studies that analyze the interactions between science, society and politics. We will specifically investigate the mechanisms by which science may impact policy-making by focusing on: the rise of science diplomacy, initiatives to use science in order to further development goals, and efforts to produce evidence-based foreign policy. We will also focus on currently hotly debated political issues in government affairs, including the politization and militarization of space, the rise of big data, the politics of climate change, and the construction of border walls. As part of this course we will hear from experts in the federal government on how they attempt to integrate science into the everyday workings of governance.

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  • Cyber Conflict and Trust

    Course No.
    STS 6031
    Instructor
    R. Slayton
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Hacktivism, cyber-crime, cyber-espionage, and cyber-war have become worrisome for individuals, corporations, and nation-states. This course analyses cyber conflict as technopolitics, showing how the specific affordances of information technology shape political possibilities, and how politics in turn shape the evolution of information technology. It is a reading, discussion, and writing-intensive course is designed for graduate students in any field of study who wish to gain a better understanding of the interactions between social, political and technical dimensions of cyberspace. Subjects include the origins of hacker culture and computer security expertise; the rise of public concerns over computer security and privacy; critical infrastructure’s growing dependence on information technology; market failures in computer security; and government policies aimed at correcting those failures.

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  • Viticulture and Vineyard Management

    Course No.
    VIEN 3440 / PLHRT 3440
    Instructor
    T. Martinson
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Second-semester course in commercial grape production with an emphasis on the problems of production in cold climates. Students examine the genetics of the vine and learn principles of vineyard establishment, propagation, pruning and training, and conservation. Laboratory exercises and field trips offer hands-on experience.

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  • Directing Community Practice

    Course No.
    VTMED 6436
    Instructor
    D. Bowman, B. Collins
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    The format is a both peer-mentored and service-learning which takes place in a clinical setting. Eight student directors organize and supervise bimonthly healthy pet clinics where they mentor other, less experienced students to provide preventative veterinary care to animals of underserved citizens in the Ithaca community.

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  • Pet Loss and Bereavement Counseling Course

    Course No.
    VTMED 6736
    Instructor
    C. Balkman, B. Collins
    Credits
    .5
    Format
    Lecture

    This course introduces veterinary students to the key issues related to the loss of a companion animal and bereavement counseling. The course provides a structured background to assist students in developing the necessary skills to deal with clients and the grieving process. Students will participate in Cornell University’s Pet Loss Support Hotline, a telephone-based community outreach program designed to provide support to callers grieving the loss of a companion animal.  Students actively participate in the prerequisite 9 hours of training in the Fall Semester, followed by hands-on experience staffing the Pet Loss Support Hotline. Requirements include attendance at both a Pet Loss Support Hotline sponsored lecture (usually scheduled in the evening) and a rounds discussion session, a case log of calls received and a one page case report.

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  • One Health Laboratory: Conservation with Communities Field Experience

    Course No.
    VTMED 6744
    Instructor
    D. Bowman, J. Felippe, T. Fishel, L. Harrington, K. McGowan, R. Radcliffe, A. Rodewald.
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The “One Health Laboratory” field course is organized in 2 courses (enrollment in both is required): Part I is the engaged-learning experience at one of the field sites in Indonesia (Ujong Kulon National Park) or Africa (Jane Goodall Institute in Republic of Congo or Uganda). The format for the field course is an applied research project that will further understanding of a problem in conservation that has impact for local people in farming or forestry conservation that has impact for local people in farming or forestry communities, and the wild species that share these working landscapes. Students will be chose during the required course “Conservation with Communities for One Health” and work in teams (1 DVM, 2 undergraduate students for each field site).

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  • One Health: Conservation with Communities- Seminars

    Course No.
    VTMED 6745
    Instructor
    D. Bowman, J. Felippe, T. Fishel, L. Harrington, K. McGowan, R. Radcliffe, A. Rodewald
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    The “One Health Laboratory” Part 2 is a fall semester debriefing course in with students will reflect and expand learning through presentations of projects (seminars) and experiences, case-directed discussions using experiential journal notes and topical readings from relevant literature, and student-led discussion of impacts/solutions to local problems, with participation of listed faculty and community partners.

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  • Learning Behind Bars

    Course No.
    WRIT 4100
    Instructor
    P. Sawyer
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    A service learning course offered in conjunction with the Basic Writing course of the Prison Education Project. Course work includes tutoring inmates once a week at Auburn Correctional Facility in addition to regular class meetings at Cornell.

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  • Service Learning for Democratic Citizenship: Literature of American Social Action Movements

    Course No.
    WRIT 4130
    Instructor
    D. Evans
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    To what extent is civic engagement fundamental to democratic citizenship? This course seeks to answer that question by exploring the components of service learning as a discipline and to strengthen the intellectual foundation of students who wish to incorporate civic engagement into their curriculum. Students will become familiar with the history of service learning, explore competing theories of social justice and social inequality, and develop a framework for social action that exists at the juncture of theory and practice. Readings will include texts by Dewey, Freire, bell hooks, Franklin, Jefferson, Thoreau, Addams, Baldwin, King, Dorothy Day, and Fanon. Weekly seminar papers as well as a term paper through which students develop their own philosophy of civic engagement.

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