Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Preparation for Engaged Learning in Global and Public Health Sciences

    Course No.
    NS 2060
    Instructor
    K. Dickin, D. Pelletier
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    This course provides foundational knowledge about community-engaged and experiential learning as it relates to global and public health and creates a dynamic classroom environment and community of learners to develop the essential orientations and skills required for success in the experiential learning and future careers in global and public health.

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  • Explorations in Global and Public Health

    Course No.
    NS 4600
    Instructor
    D. Pelletier
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This capstone course provides guidance, conceptual tools, feedback and a dedicated space in the schedule for students to design, complete and communicate a capstone project on a topic of their choosing that allows them to demonstrate their mastery of the learning outcomes for the Global and Public Health Sciences major or Global Health minor.

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  • Community Nutrition in Action

    Course No.
    NS 6250
    Instructor
    P. Weisberg-Shapiro
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Provides students enrolled as dietetic interns with supervised, in-depth experiences in a community nutrition program and fosters the integration of research, theory, and practice. Through placements in community programs, students gain experience in program administration and in assessing, designing, implementing, and evaluating food and nutrition programs for targeted populations through public and private organizations. In weekly seminars (and other seminars and observations as arranged) students integrate theory and practice, reflect upon their placement experience, learn about community nutrition research, and explore the many issues facing community food and nutrition practitioners.

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  • Introduction to Community Nutrition Research for Dietetic Interns

    Course No.
    NS 6350
    Instructor
    K. Hanson
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Introduces the paradigms, concepts, methods, and issues involved in community nutrition research. Students design and conduct individual research projects to inform community nutrition programs. Lectures, readings, and class discussion support students as they conduct their research activities.

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  • Worldly Explorations: Gateway to Engaged International Experiences for Undergraduates

    Course No.
    NTRES 2050 / IARD 2050
    Instructor
    J. Lassoie
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    This discussion-based course introduces opportunities for international study available to juniors and seniors. Grounded in experiential learning through community engagement, public service, and leadership training, guest faculty and students discuss stimulating real-world learning experiences arising from a variety of courses and semesters abroad that include fieldwork in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Opportunities for academic coursework beyond Cornell and for research and practical internships are also discussed. The course provides an opportunity for students to develop a personalized plan of study that matches their personal and professional aspirations. Such preparation might include combinations of area and language studies; training in community engagement, public service, and/or leadership; international travel workshops, specialized coursework, and/or research methodological development.

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  • Ways of Knowing: Indigenous and Place-Based Ecological Knowledge

    Course No.
    NTRES 3330
    Instructor
    K-A. S. Kassam
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Based on indigenous and place-based “ways of knowing,” this course (1) presents a theoretical and humanistic framework from which to understand generation of ecological knowledge; (2) examines processes by which to engage indigenous and place-based knowledge of natural resources, the nonhuman environment, and human-environment interactions; and (3) reflects upon the relevance of this knowledge to climatic change, resource extraction, food sovereignty, medicinal plant biodiversity, and issues of sustainability and conservation.  The fundamental premise of this course is that human beings are embedded in their ecological systems.

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  • Student-Community Partnerships in Ecuador I

    Course No.
    NTRES 4011 / IARD 4011 / LATA 4011
    Instructor
    J. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Links students with community partners in a mountainous region of Ecuador in preparation for a service-learning fieldtrip during Winter Break (IARD 6011). The course exposes students to local people who have rejected the prospect of open-pit mining, and instead are pursuing sustainable community-based conservation and enterprise development. Readings, multi-media, guest lectures, and facilitated discussions explore and deconstruct questions of power and privilege, social responsibility, environmental responsibility, civil disobedience, and social equity. Students collaborate directly with Ecuadorean partners during the semester to develop relevant projects. Topical areas for collaboration may include artisanal handicrafts, ecotourism, organic coffee, and/or community-based conservation.

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  • Land Use and Sustainable Livelihoods in the Nilgris

    Course No.
    NTRES 4520
    Instructor
    S. Wolf
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course addresses land use and land governance in the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. Students explore how changes in land use shape prospects for sustainable livelihoods in connection with agriculture, non-timber forest products, and tourism. This course is offered in conjunction with Cornell Abroad’s program: Cornell in India: Nilgiris Field Learning Center (NFLC). The NFLC is an engaged learning and research program where Cornell students and members of local communities live, study, and research together for 16 weeks each spring.

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  • Agents of Change: Community Organizing for the Public Good

    Course No.
    NTRES 4820 / DSOC 4820 / PMA 4820
    Instructor
    S. Peters
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Democracy is more than a system of government. It’s a way of life. It’s a kind of politics that involves the development and exercise of power and the performance of civic roles on and off public stages. How can we achieve the promise of democracy in today’s world? How can we engage in public work as effective and ethical change agents of change? And how can we build and sustain a public culture that develops and honors the knowledge, talents, capacities, and expertise of a diverse population? We will take these questions up together in this course through case studies, personal experiences, readings, narrative interviews, skill-building workshops, and field trips.

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  • Case Studies in International Ecoagriculture and Environmental Conservation

    Course No.
    NTRES 4850 / ESS 4850 / IARD 4850
    Instructor
    J. P. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course has been designed for students interested in applying their accumulated knowledge and experiences to interdisciplinary, real-world problems facing food and fiber production, environmental conservation, and sustainable development worldwide. Early in the course we will examine through readings, websites, and facilitated discussions the complexity of ‘wicked’ problems and how best to address their possible solutions, develop team-working skills, and briefly review contemporary case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the U.S. Guest discussion leaders will be involved as appropriate. The majority of semester will be dedicated to a team exercise that will systematically develop a detailed plan for designing, managing, and monitoring a field-based integrated conservation and development project for a student-selected case study scenario. This approach will provide a set of tools that can be readily adapted for developing conservation and sustainable development projects in many different international and domestic settings. Active in-class participation and out-of-class work is expected and a final written team report and class presentation are required.

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  • Research Design, Practice, and Policy

    Course No.
    PAM 3120 / SOC 3150
    Instructor
    K. Musick
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Examines systematic approaches for addressing questions about poverty, family life, racial inequality, and a range of other issues central to public policy. It emphasizes the logic and methods of social science research, including the measurement of social phenomena, generalizing results to groups of interest, establishing cause and effect, social experiments, survey research, and qualitative methods. It develops skills to critically evaluate the research of others and provides hands-on experience applying research methods to policy-related problems.

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  • Population Health for Health Managers

    Course No.
    PAM 5280
    Instructor
    J. Carmalt
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Provides students with training in the language, theories, concepts, methods, measurement, analysis, and implementation of population health. A framework of core functions and essential features of population health is used to familiarize students with the unique challenges of disease surveillance, health measurement and monitoring, identification of health indicators and determinants, measuring health disparities, and developing population health policies and programs. Key to this course is the role of epidemiology in evaluating population health, and developing interventions to improve different populations’ health and reduce health disparities. Students develop competencies in population health analysis and management such as identification, analysis, evaluation, estimation, inference, implementation, and evaluation which are not only valued in the job market but also welcomed in a variety of research and other employment fields.

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  • Field Studies in Health Administration and Planning

    Course No.
    PAM 5951
    Instructor
    M. Sherman
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    Students interested in developing administrative and program-planning research skills are given an opportunity to evaluate an ongoing phase of health care agency activity in the light of sound administrative practice and principles of good medical care. In planning and carrying out the research, students work closely with a skilled practicing administrator and with members of the faculty.

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  • Field Study in Health Administration and Planning

    Course No.
    PAM 5952
    Instructor
    M. Sherman
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Students interested in developing administrative and program-planning research skills are given an opportunity to evaluate an ongoing phase of health care agency activity in the light of sound administrative practice and principles of good medical care. In planning and carrying out the research, students work closely with a skilled practicing administrator and with members of the faculty.

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  • The Art of Horticulture

    Course No.
    PLHRT 2010
    Instructor
    M. Eames-Sheavly
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Discover the ways in which plants can be used in or as art (e.g., living sculpture, woven branch, and more) and as a subject of art (e.g., botanical illustration, painting, and more). Explore the relationship between plants and art to develop a distinctive lens through which to view the world. Foster keen observation skills and an understanding of the principles of design and presentation in living forms. This course offers a reflective exploration into self, the classroom, our campus community, and the world by engaging with the plant world in a creative context. Requirements include participation in studio, reflective writing and creative project work.  Materials fee.

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  • Urban Ecosystems

    Course No.
    PLHRT 2240
    Instructor
    T. H. Whitlow
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Ecology has historically neglected cities because they are human dominated systems, while the complexity of urban governance makes it difficult to apply ecological research to urban policy. Through lectures, case studies, readings, and discussion, this course explores interactions between political decisions and ecological outcomes in the urban context.

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  • Viticulture and Vineyard Management

    Course No.
    PLHRT 3440 / VIEN 3440
    Instructor
    T. Martinson
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Second-semester course in commercial grape production with an emphasis on the problems of production in cold climates. Students examine the genetics of the vine and learn principles of vineyard establishment, propagation, pruning and training, and conservation. Laboratory exercises and field trips offer hands-on experience.

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  • Restoration Ecology

    Course No.
    PLHRT 4400
    Instructor
    T. H. Whitlow
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    Draws concepts from ecology, hydrology, soil science, and conservation biology and applies these in both principle and practice to the rapidly evolving field of restoration ecology. Through lectures, reading, and discussion, site visits to active restoration sites, and a real-world class project, students learn and practice skills needed to develop restoration plans for a variety of situations.

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  • Public Garden Management

    Course No.
    PLHRT 4850
    Instructor
    D. A. Rakow
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Explores the history of public gardens, types of contemporary public gardens, and the operation of public gardens including botanical gardens and arboreta. Includes separate units on administration and business management of gardens, collections curatorship, collections design, educational programs, research, and management of landscapes and natural areas.

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  • Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment

    Course No.
    PLHRT 4910 / LA 4910
    Instructor
    N. L. Bassuk, P. J. Trowbridge
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Focuses on the identification, uses, and establishment of woody plants in urban and garden settings. By understanding the environmental limitations to plant growth, students are able to critically assess potential planting sites; select appropriate trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers for a given site; and learn about the principles and practices of site amelioration and plant establishment. Design followed by written specifications and graphic details are developed to implement these practices. No prior design experience necessary.

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  • Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment

    Course No.
    PLHRT 4920 / LA 4920
    Instructor
    N. L. Bassuk, P. J. Trowbridge
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This is the second half of course focusing on the winter identification, uses, and establishment of woody plants in urban and garden settings. Issues of site assessment and soil remediation are emphasized in addition to soil volume calculations, drainage and surface detailing, and planting techniques. Students critically assess potential planting sites and select appropriate trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers for a given site. Design for specific sites followed by written specifications and graphic details are produced to implement these proposals. Students implement, in a hands-on manner, site remediation and planting techniques they have learned by creating new landscapes that serve to integrate theory, principles, and practices. Together, PLHRT 4910 and HORT 4920 constitute an integrated course.

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  • Internship in Horticulture

    Course No.
    PLHRT 4960
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    On-the-job learning experience under the supervision of professionals in a cooperating organization. A learning contract is written between the faculty supervisor and student, stating the conditions of the work assignment, supervision, and reporting. All 4960 internship courses must adhere to the CALS guidelines at cals.cornell.edu/academics/student-research/internship.

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  • Hortus Forum Officer Leadership Development

    Course No.
    PLHRT 4975
    Instructor
    M. Eames-Sheavly
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Leadership development for Hortus Forum officers, which includes, but is not limited to, learning how to: foster inclusiveness and a healthy, positive social atmosphere among members; promote an interest in plants; communicate and collaborate effectively with greenhouse staff, faculty advisors, and other faculty, staff, administrators and students; and maintain the reputation, continuity and history of a long running Cornell organization.

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  • Plant Science and Systems

    Course No.
    PLSCI 1101
    Instructor
    F. S. Rossi
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This course will explore the scientific principles and processes forming the foundation of plant-based systems that provide food, fiber, beverage, environmental enhancement, medicine, art, and support of our spiritual pursuits. Students will learn the language of plants and growing systems that includes the complex interactions among climate, soil, and plants that adapt and withstand human manipulation to meet our needs and desires. This course will challenge the notions of sustainable, organic, GMOs and how plants solve environmental problems. We investigate the science behind soil health, pest management strategies, ecosystem services as well as plant nutritional and phytochemical value. Finally, we increase awareness of the role plants have played in our fundamental beliefs and the diversity of cultures, deeply connected to our visual stimuli and interactions among phytochemicals and neurochemicals.

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  • Collaboration, Leadership, and Career Skills in the Plant Sciences

    Course No.
    PLSCI 1110
    Instructor
    L. Cook, M. Pritts
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Seminar provides opportunities to meet other students and faculty; develop collaboration, leadership, and career skills in the discipline; and make connections with the world beyond the campus.

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  • Field Crop Systems

    Course No.
    PLSCS 4050
    Instructor
    J. Lauren, T. L. Setter
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Principles of field-crop production of food, feed, fiber and bioenergy. Includes introductory concepts of plant growth, development and maturation as they relate to crop performance and management, adaptation to soil, climatic and environmental conditions, tillage, mineral nutrition, pests, cropping sequences, management systems, and crop improvement. Grain, oilseed, biofuel and forage crops are emphasized. Lab report and term paper on field crop systems required. Designed for professional students or advanced undergraduates.

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  • Agents of Change: Community Organizing for the Public Good

    Course No.
    PMA 4820 / DSOC 4820 / NTRES 4820
    Instructor
    S. Peters
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Democracy is more than a system of government. It’s a way of life. It’s a kind of politics that involves the development and exercise of power and the performance of civic roles on and off public stages. How can we achieve the promise of democracy in today’s world? How can we engage in public work as effective and ethical change agents of change? And how can we build and sustain a public culture that develops and honors the knowledge, talents, capacities, and expertise of a diverse population? We will take these questions up together in this course through case studies, personal experiences, readings, narrative interviews, skill-building workshops, and field trips.

    View full course description
  • Community Outreach

    Course No.
    PSYCH 2820 / HD 2820
    Instructor
    H. Segal
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Provides students with information and perspectives essential to volunteer fieldwork with human and social service programs in the community. Readings are drawn from the field of community psychology and include analyses of successful programs, such as Head Start, as well as a review of the methods by which those programs are developed and assessed. Although students are not required to volunteer, the instructor provides students with a list of local agencies open to student placements.

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  • Field Practicum I

    Course No.
    PSYCH 3270
    Instructor
    H. Segal
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Composed of three components that form an intensive undergraduate field practicum. First, students spend three to six hours a week at local mental health agencies, schools, or nursing facilities working directly with children, adolescents, or adults; supervision is provided by host agency staff. Second, the instructor provides additional weekly individual, clinical supervision for each student. Third, seminar meetings cover issues of adult and developmental psychopathology, clinical technique, case studies, and current research issues. Students write one short paper, two final take-home exams, and present an account of their field experience in class.

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  • Research Design, Practice, and Policy

    Course No.
    SOC 3150 / PAM 3120
    Instructor
    K. Musick
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Examines systematic approaches for addressing questions about poverty, family life, racial inequality, and a range of other issues central to public policy. It emphasizes the logic and methods of social science research, including the measurement of social phenomena, generalizing results to groups of interest, establishing cause and effect, social experiments, survey research, and qualitative methods. It develops skills to critically evaluate the research of others and provides hands-on experience applying research methods to policy-related problems.

    View full course description