Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Externship – Part Time, Other Local

    Course No.
    LAW 7834
    Instructor
    G. G. Galbreath
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The Externship – Part Time, Other Local course allows students to earn 4 or more credit hours as externs working at least 8 hours per week at approved placement sites in the Ithaca area while continuing to attend classes at the law school (most sites are with non-profit organizations or governmental agencies). The course purpose is to provide a bridge between the study of law and its practice. A written application for the course must be submitted to the instructor and approved during the semester preceding the semester the student plans to participate. The student must be supervised/mentored by an attorney and engage in meaningful and “attorney-like” work at the placement which furthers the student’s education and career goals. In addition to his or her work responsibilities at the placement, the extern will create a Learning Agenda, prepare weekly Journal entries, engage in a regular electronic Discussion Board with other externs and the instructor, host the instructor for a site visit, and do a written Description of Placement (see the BlackBoard website for Externship – Part Time, Other Local and the site for Externship – Full Time for more detail on these requirements).

    View full course description
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7837
    Instructor
    E. Brundige
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This Clinic provides students with an opportunity to gain firsthand experience in international human rights advocacy. Through a critical seminar and practical case and project work, students will examine and engage in local, global, and transnational efforts to advance human rights. Students will develop skills such as interviewing, fact-finding, project and case management, international and comparative legal research, legal drafting, and oral advocacy by working on projects and cases for human rights organizations, judges, intergovernmental human rights experts or bodies, and individuals. The course will give students experience in diverse methods of human rights advocacy, such as fact-finding and reporting, domestic and international litigation, legal assistance and counseling, and human rights education. Examples of past projects include conducting field research in Zambia for a report on the problem of sexual violence against girls in schools, preparing an amicus brief in support of a petition on the right to free education in Colombia, and participating in a trial advocacy training program on human trafficking for judges and lawyers in Liberia. Students will also have the opportunity to examine critically the ethical, political, cultural, and other challenges that affect the promotion of human rights. Some projects may involve optional international travel, and some projects may address human rights issues within the United States.

    View full course description
  • Human Rights Advocacy at Home and Abroad

    Course No.
    LAW 7838
    Instructor
    S. Babcock
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    In this clinical course, students will work on projects that will expose them to diverse forms of human rights advocacy. The clinic is litigation-oriented, although clinic students may also be exposed to legislative advocacy and may have the opportunity to engage in fact-finding and research regarding human rights violations abroad. A current sampling of projects includes: (1) appellate advocacy on behalf of prisoners in Malawi who have been denied the right to counsel, and collaboration with lawyers in Malawi to reduce prison overcrowding and protect the rights of pre-trial detainees (in the past, a number of clinic students have traveled to Malawi to work directly with prisoners there); (2) representation of a prisoner at Guantanamo who was tortured by U.S. interrogators; and (3) working with lawyers around the world to promote the implementation of international norms regarding the application of the death penalty.

    View full course description
  • Farmworker Legal Assistance Clinic I

    Course No.
    LAW 7857
    Instructor
    B. Lyon
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    Permission of instructor required. Students who wish to apply to the clinic should submit a resume, transcript, and short statement of interest (no more than two pages) to Prof. Lyon. For more information about the clinic, email Prof. Lyon (beth.lyon@cornell.edu) and schedule a meeting. This course requires off premises travel to meet with clients and participate in hearings. Employment on a farm is one of the worlds’ most difficult and dangerous occupations. Farmworkers experience geographic, linguistic, and cultural isolation, separation from family, immigration insecurity reinforced by policing practices, workplace sexual violence, and exclusion from protective employment laws. Working with the new clinic’s community partners, Farmworker Legal Assistance Clinic I student attorneys will handle immigration and employment matters on behalf of farmworkers in the region, work that will typically involve negotiation and often require litigation. Students will also work in brief advice and referral outreach sessions in farmworker communities. Clinic participants may also have the opportunity to work on research and writing projects with civil rights, environmental protection, and farmworker rights organizations. Farmworker Clinic students will participate in a lawyering seminar and work with a clinic partner on their assigned cases. The lawyering seminar will focus on skills students need for effective client representation. Students will develop key lawyering skills, including interviewing, counseling, fact investigation, drafting, negotiation, language accessible practice, and, in some cases, trial advocacy.

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  • Externship – Pro Bono Scholars Program

    Course No.
    LAW 7862
    Instructor
    G. Galbreath
    Credits
    12
    Format
    Lecture

    The Externship – Pro Bono Scholars Program course allows third year students in their last semester to take the NY Bar Examination in February 2016 and then earn their last 12 credits hours working full time from early March – late May 2016 as externs at approved placement sites doing exclusively pro bono legal services for indigent clients. The course purpose is to provide a bridge between the study of law and its practice, as well as serving low income clients who might otherwise not receive legal services. A written application for the course must be submitted to the instructor and approved during the early fall of the student’s third year. The student must be supervised/mentored by an attorney and engage in meaningful and “attorney-like” work at the placement. The experience must further the student’s education and career goals. In addition to his or her work responsibilities for the placement and indigent clients, the extern will create a Learning Agenda, prepare weekly Journal entries, engage in a regular electronic Discussion Board with other externs and the instructor, host the instructor for a site visit, and do a written Description of Placement. See the BlackBoard web site for more details on this course. Note: This course requires off premises travel. The student is responsible for travel to and from the sites.

    View full course description
  • Juvenile Justice Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7870
    Instructor
    J. H. Blume, S. L. Johnson, K. M. Weyble
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This clinic will respond to the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Miller v. Alabama holding that juvenile offenders cannot be sentenced to mandatory terms of life without parole. Students will assist counsel appointed to represent juveniles sentenced to life without parole terms and juveniles facing potential life without parole sentences in the development and presentation of mitigating evidence in regard to both the crime and the juvenile’s life history. Travel may be required as most students will be involved in investigation.

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  • Labor Law Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7871
    Instructor
    A. Cornell
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The Labor Law Clinic will provide students a practical opportunity to learn labor law, while making meaningful contributions to the labor movement and working people. This clinic will combine a substantive classroom component with practical experience. Students will advise labor unions and workers on a variety of legal issues that surface during the semester and may have the opportunity to represent unions in different forums. Students will communicate directly with union representatives and will be required to sort through the facts, research the issues, and provide information and advice. Students will routinely draft legal memoranda, prepare and file pleadings and briefs as required. Students may have the opportunity to represent unions at hearings, mediation or arbitration. Students may also be required to observe a hearing before the National Labor Relations Board, Public Employment Relations Board or an arbitration. Students have also been invited to observe the collective bargaining process.

    A small number of students will have the opportunity to dedicate their clinical time to international labor law. Interested students can support the work of nonprofit organizations or global union federations with ongoing cases or projects. These projects occasionally involve a short period of field work outside of the country, typically in Latin America.

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  • Land Use, Development, and Natural Resource Protection Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7872
    Instructor
    K. S. Porter, C. G. Bowman
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Land use laws are a vital aspect of sustainable development. Balancing social, economic and environmental factors involves a rich and multi-faceted body of laws. This clinic provides students with the opportunity to work hands-on to identify, design and implement economically and legally viable solutions to problems arising from land and natural resources management. Participating students will assist clients such as developers, government agencies, community leaders, and NGOs according to their selected project. An increasingly critical concern is the role of land use and development on the quantity and quality of water resources. Another high priority, of national as well as local importance, is the development of energy resources, and the complexities of the legal issues posed by their environmental and land use impacts.

    Students have the opportunity to work on an international issue. Issues include sustainable development, transboundary conflicts, stresses in rural and indigenous communities, and the role of women. For students undertaking an international project, products may include consultative papers or other briefing materials and presentations. The Clinic will cosponsor an international conference in Spring 2012.

    With faculty guidance, students conduct their own selected project on a topic or dispute of theoretical and practical legal importance. Projects may include or involve: a detailed theoretical and practical legal analysis of a selected problem; drafting or critically reviewing municipal ordinances and inter-municipal agreements; consulting on design parameters for development sites; drafting petition/explanatory documents for clients who wish to obtain variances; resolving compliance issues with state and local laws; and developing alternative dispute resolution or collaborative options.

    Students commonly attend meetings, and draft briefing papers or give presentations to their clients, such as local governments and agencies. Because this clinic offers a great variety of transactional work, it will benefit students interested in transactional practices, particularly in a career in real estate, land use, energy issues, finance, general practice, and environmental law. No exam.

    View full course description
  • Juvenile Justice Clinic II

    Course No.
    LAW 7873
    Instructor
    J. H. Blume, S. L. Johnson, K. M. Weyble
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will represent prisoners who were sentenced to life in prison without parole for offenses committed as juveniles.

    View full course description
  • Cornell Legal Aid Clinic I

    Course No.
    LAW 7874
    Instructor
    J. Feldman
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    In this clinic, student attorneys will represent low-income persons who reside in the greater Ithaca area. The clinic will concentrate especially on areas of the law in which there are few opportunities for low-income clients to obtain representation in civil matters. School law will be a focus, and clinic students will represent K-12 students and their parents in special education, school discipline, and school residency cases. The clinic will also accept cases in the areas of civil rights (including employment discrimination, disability rights, and fair housing), economic justice (including wage theft and other wage and hour violations), and access to governmental benefits (including Medicaid, food stamps, SSI/SSD, and unemployment insurance).

    In all types of cases, students will gain valuable litigation skills, negotiation skills, and client representation skills, by advocating for clients in a variety of administrative hearings and court proceedings.   Several sessions of the clinic seminar will be taught jointly with Professor Susan Hazeldean; her LGBT Clinic students will also join those class sessions.

    The clinic will be taught by Visiting Clinical Professor Jonathan Feldman, a public interest lawyer with extensive experience in special education cases and civil rights cases. Students who wish to apply to the clinic should submit a resume, transcript, and brief statement of interest (no more than 1 page) to Prof. Feldman by email, at jfeldman@empirejustice.org.

     

    View full course description
  • Attorneys for Children

    Course No.
    LAW 7881
    Instructor
    A. J. Mooney
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students are placed at the local Attorneys for Children office, where they assist the attorneys in the representation of children in custody, abuse and neglect cases, juvenile delinquency proceedings, and PINS (Person in Need of Supervision) cases. Students accompany attorneys on home and school visits, attend court conferences, treatment team meetings and various Family Court hearings. Duties may include client interviewing, investigation, drafting memoranda and motions, and trial preparation. Students may also be able to appear in Family Court under the supervision of the Attorneys for Children staff. There will be several meetings with the instructor during the semester. Weekly journals are also required.

    View full course description
  • Advocacy for LGBT Communities Practicum I

    Course No.
    LAW 7905
    Instructor
    S. Curran
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Prerequisite: completion of 2 full semesters of law study at a U.S. law school. Permission of the instructor.  Limited enrollment.  12 to 16 hours of work per week. This course has two components. First, a weekly seminar that covers a survey of different legal topics affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals and communities. Topics include relationship recognition, parentage, custody, asylum, employment discrimination, and more. This seminar generally takes place at Cornell Law School. Second, students will spend, on average, 8 hours per week doing client work and case rounds in Syracuse at the offices of the Volunteer Lawyers Project of Onondaga County. Students will work on a variety of legal cases and advocacy projects that advance or defend the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals and communities.  Students will work on developing fundamental lawyering skills such as interviewing, client counseling, and drafting of court forms.  Students will also have the opportunity to engage in public education, legal research and other advocacy.  Students must be able to arrange for their own travel to and from Syracuse on a weekly basis. Students are requested to submit a resume, transcript and letter of interest when applying.

    View full course description
  • Advocacy for LGBT Communities Practicum II

    Course No.
    LAW 7906
    Instructor
    S. Curran
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Prerequisite: Completion of LGBT Practicum I. Completion of 2 full semesters of law study at a U.S. law school. Permission of the instructor.  Limited enrollment.  Class may be taken for 2 or 3 credits; 6 to 10 hours of work per week. Students will continue the client work portion of the Practicum I.  Students will work with instructor to identify number of hours worked in Syracuse versus remotely. Students will attend on average 1 hour of class per week for case rounds and for new subject material not covered during their time in Practicum I.

    View full course description
  • Advocacy for LGBT Communities Clinic (LGBT Clinic) III

    Course No.
    LAW 7907
    Instructor
    S. Hazeldean
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    The LGBT clinic is dedicated to advancing the legal rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. Students who have completed LGBT Clinic II can seek the instructor’s permission to enroll in LGBT Clinic III for 2, 3, or 4 credits, depending on the number of projects undertaken. Students in LGBT Clinic III work on individual cases for clients and/or non-litigation advocacy projects. They attend 4 seminar class meetings during the semester.

    View full course description
  • Externship – Part Time, Neighborhood Legal Services

    Course No.
    LAW 7911
    Instructor
    G. Galbreath
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The Externship – Part Time, Neighborhood Legal Services course allows 1 or 2 students to earn 5 or more credit hours as externs working at least 17 hours per week at the local legal services office in Ithaca (formally known as Legal Assistance of Western New York, Tompkins/Tioga Neighborhood Legal Services)(NLS) while continuing to attend classes at the law school. The course purpose is to provide a bridge between the study of law and its practice. A written application for the course must be submitted to the instructor and approved during the semester preceding the semester the student plans to participate. The student must be supervised/mentored by an NLS attorney and engage in meaningful and “attorney-like” work at the placement which furthers the student’s education and career goals. In addition to his or her work responsibilities at NLS, the extern will create a Learning Agenda, prepare weekly Journal entries, engage in a regular electronic Discussion Board with other externs and the instructor, host the instructor for a site visit, and do a written Description of Placement (see the BlackBoard web site for Externship – Part Time, Neighborhood Legal Services and the site for Externship – Full Time for more detail on these requirements).

    View full course description
  • Global Gender Justice Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7914
    Instructor
    E. Brundige
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This Clinic explores how human rights law can be used to advance gender justice locally and globally. Through a critical seminar and practical case and project work, students will examine and engage in local, global, and transnational efforts to combat gender violence and discrimination. Students will develop skills such as interviewing, fact-finding, project and case management, international and comparative legal research, legal drafting, and oral advocacy by working on projects and cases for human rights organizations, judges, intergovernmental human rights experts or bodies, and individuals. The course will give students hands-on experience in diverse methods of human rights advocacy, including fact-finding and reporting, legal assistance and counseling, domestic and international litigation, and human rights education. Project work focuses on issues related to gender justice such as: domestic violence; so-called “honor” crimes, gender violence in schools, prisons or other institutional settings; gender and HIV/AIDS; sexual offenses in armed conflict; child marriage; violations of women’s property and inheritance rights; and trafficking in persons. Students will also have the opportunity to examine critically the ethical, political, cultural, and other challenges that affect the promotion of global gender justice. Some projects may involve optional domestic or international travel, and some projects may address gender justice issues within the United States. Students who wish to apply to the clinic should pre-register and also submit a resume, transcript, and statement of interest to Prof. Brundige (eb456@cornell.edu) by the end of the pre-registration period.

    View full course description
  • Advanced Global Gender Justice Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7915
    Instructor
    E. Brundige
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    This course offers students who have completed the International Human Rights Clinic or Global Gender Justice Clinic the opportunity to pursue one or more projects in conjunction with the Global Gender Justice Clinic. Students will work in teams with other students enrolled in the advanced or regular Clinic. They will gain experience in legal advocacy on issues relating to gender violence and discrimination and develop human rights lawyering and leadership skills. Students will participate in regular project team and all-clinic meetings.

    View full course description
  • Real Estate Litigation Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7920
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will help prepare for trial in a property-related lawsuit filed against Norfolk Southern Railway in New York state court on behalf of a group of homeowners in Lansing, New York. Students will help prepare the record for appeal and assist in the research and drafting of the appeals briefs. The course will be limited to 3 students, selected on the basis of academic strength as well as demonstrated interest in property and land use issues. Those interested should submit a resume, transcript, and brief statement (no more than 1 page) to Prof. Peñalver.

    View full course description
  • Prosecution Trial Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7921
    Instructor
    R. A. Sarachan
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture


    This course gives students the opportunity to prosecute non-felony non-jury trials in Ithaca City Court. The course has both a classroom component and a courtroom component.

    The classroom component involves lecture, discussion and trial simulation exercises. Topics include criminal law and procedure, prosecution ethics, trial strategy and preparation, trial conduct including direct and cross-examination, plea-bargaining and professional judgment.

    The courtroom component involves regular attendance at Ithaca City Court’s non-jury terms. Students will observe and critique trials and will prosecute offenses including traffic tickets (such as speeding and running a red light), city code violations (such as open container and noise offenses), non-felony penal law violations (such as disorderly conduct, possession of marijuana) among others. Each student will be expected to conduct multiple trials during the semester, depending on docket volume.

    During the semester students will also be expected to prepare witnesses (typically police officers), conduct plea-bargaining negotiations, case research and fact investigation, respond to discovery demands, and engage in motion practice and appellate practice as needed.

     

    View full course description
  • Real Estate Litigation Clinic 2

    Course No.
    LAW 7922
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will help prepare for trial in a property-related lawsuit filed against Norfolk Southern Railway in New York state court on behalf of a group of homeowners in Lansing, New York. Students will help prepare the record for appeal and assist in the research and drafting of the appeals briefs. The course will be limited to 3 students, selected on the basis of academic strength as well as demonstrated interest in property and land use issues. Those interested should submit a resume, transcript, and brief statement (no more than 1 page) to Prof. Peñalver.

    View full course description
  • New York Attorney General Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7925
    Instructor
    J. Callery, E. McArdle, C. Wiles
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    The New York State Attorney General offers a clinic in which law students work 12-15 hours per week in his office in Syracuse, New York and attend a weekly class at Cornell. Each student is assigned to work with an Assistant Attorney General. Students perform legal research, writing, analysis, draft original legal documents, provide trial support, and will have an opportunity to attend hearings, trials, court arguments, and pre-trial proceedings. Students will acquire litigation skills as well as specialized knowledge of public advocacy litigation. The class will focus on legal and ethical issues seen in litigation and review student experiences working in the Attorney General’s office. Each week a different subject area of Attorney General practice will be discussed. Topics include medical malpractice, defective highway design, public advocacy litigation, 1983 civil rights actions in Federal Court, petitions in State Court seeking to overturn state actions, and prisoner claims. Guest speakers will be attorneys serving in various capacities in State or Federal government and may include a judge or court attorney. A field trip to a State facility, such as a prison, hospital or juvenile confinement center, is planned. There will also be a pro bono opportunity to accompany an attorney to a volunteer legal services clinics operated by the Onondaga County Bar Association.

    View full course description
  • United States Attorney’s Office Externship

    Course No.
    LAW 7951
    Instructor
    C. E. Roberts
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    The United States Attorney’s Office Clinic is a program in which law students work 12-15 hours per week for the United States Attorney’s Office in Syracuse, New York. Each student is assigned to work for an Assistant United States Attorney. Students perform research and writing, and trial assistance as needed. Students may qualify to appear in court under the supervision of their attorney, and are encouraged to observe court proceedings in the U.S. Courthouse. Students also attend a two hour seminar once a week at Cornell. The seminar will focus on writing in practice, including critiques of briefs, motions, and a petition for certiorari. Additional topics include federal criminal and civil practice, prosecutorial discretion, and habeas corpus. Guest speakers may include judges, a special prosecutor, and U.S. Department of Justice officials.

    Students must be a U.S. citizen. A detailed course description is available at: https://support.law.cornell.edu/students/forms/ClinicalCoursesAndExternshipsDescriptions.pdf

     

    View full course description
  • United States Attorney’s Office Clinic 2

    Course No.
    LAW 7952
    Instructor
    C. E. Roberts
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    The United States Attorney’s Office Clinic is a program in which law students work 12-15 hours per week for the United States Attorney’s Office in Syracuse, New York. Each student is assigned to work for an Assistant United States Attorney. Students perform research and writing, and trial assistance as needed. Students may qualify to appear in court under the supervision of their attorney, and are encouraged to observe court proceedings in the U.S. Courthouse. Students also attend a two hour seminar once a week at Cornell. The seminar will focus on writing in practice, including critiques of briefs, motions, and a petition for certiorari. Additional topics include federal criminal and civil practice, prosecutorial discretion, and habeas corpus. Guest speakers may include judges, a special prosecutor, and U.S. Department of Justice officials.

    Students must be a U.S. citizen. A detailed course description is available at: https://support.law.cornell.edu/students/forms/ClinicalCoursesAndExternshipsDescriptions.pdf

     

    View full course description
  • Securities Law Clinic 1

    Course No.
    LAW 7953
    Instructor
    W. A. Jacobson
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The course will focus on fundamental investigatory and advocacy skills applicable to representation of public investors in disputes subject to arbitration at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (f/k/a National Association of Securities Dealers), with particular attention to the elderly and to small investors. Substantive legal topics will include the scope and nature of binding arbitration under the Federal Arbitration Act and New York law, and the legal and regulatory remedies available to defrauded investors. Coursework will include training in skills such as interviewing potential clients, evaluating potential claims, preparing pleadings, conducting discovery, representing clients at hearings and negotiating settlements. Class work will include presentations by nationally-recognized experts on topics applicable to evaluation of securities accounts, trading, and products. Students will have the opportunity under faculty supervision to represent investors, to provide public education to community groups as to investment frauds, to draft position statements to regulatory authorities, and/or to participate in preparing amicus briefs, in support of public investors.

    View full course description
  • Securities Law Clinic 2

    Course No.
    LAW 7954
    Instructor
    Fall, W. A. Jacobson, B. Siegel; spring W. A. Jacobson.
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The course will focus on fundamental investigatory and advocacy skills applicable to representation of public investors in disputes subject to arbitration at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (f/k/a National Association of Securities Dealers), with particular attention to the elderly and to small investors. Substantive legal topics will include the scope and nature of binding arbitration under the Federal Arbitration Act and New York law, and the legal and regulatory remedies available to defrauded investors. Coursework will include training in skills such as interviewing potential clients, evaluating potential claims, preparing pleadings, conducting discovery, representing clients at hearings and negotiating settlements. Class work will include presentations by nationally-recognized experts on topics applicable to evaluation of securities accounts, trading, and products. Students will have the opportunity under faculty supervision to represent investors, to provide public education to community groups as to investment frauds, to draft position statements to regulatory authorities, and/or to participate in preparing amicus briefs, in support of public investors.

    View full course description
  • Securities Law Clinic 3

    Course No.
    LAW 7955
    Instructor
    W. A. Jacobson
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The course will focus on fundamental investigatory and advocacy skills applicable to representation of public investors in disputes subject to arbitration at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (f/k/a National Association of Securities Dealers), with particular attention to the elderly and to small investors. Substantive legal topics will include the scope and nature of binding arbitration under the Federal Arbitration Act and New York law, and the legal and regulatory remedies available to defrauded investors. Coursework will include training in skills such as interviewing potential clients, evaluating potential claims, preparing pleadings, conducting discovery, representing clients at hearings and negotiating settlements. Class work will include presentations by nationally-recognized experts on topics applicable to evaluation of securities accounts, trading, and products. Students will have the opportunity under faculty supervision to represent investors, to provide public education to community groups as to investment frauds, to draft position statements to regulatory authorities, and/or to participate in preparing amicus briefs, in support of public investors.

    View full course description
  • Immigrant Ithaca

    Course No.
    LSP 2252 / AMST 2252 / HIST 2252
    Instructor
    M. C. Garcia
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This engaged learning course allows students to combine community service with academic learning. Students will learn about the post-1965 immigration to the United States, and especially to Ithaca and upstate New York. We will examine the reasons for migration, the policies that facilitated entry, and the particular needs of immigrant populations in the local setting. Because this course is a seminar there is a strong emphasis on the discussion of the weekly readings, and class participation weighs heavily in the assessment of the final grade. A key component of this course is the community service project. In consultation with the professor, students will identify and work on individual service projects in the local community and must agree to commit a minimum of 3-4 hours per week to their project. In the past, students have worked with a number of local organizations including the Immigrant Services Program at Catholic Charities; the Tompkins County Living Wage Coalition & Workers’ Rights Center; the BOCES ESL Program; the Translator Program; and the Cornell Friends of the Farmworkers.

    View full course description
  • Cultures and Communities

    Course No.
    LSP 2300
    Instructor
    D. Castillo
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Conceived as a service-learning course, the centerpiece here is targeted, engaged research and arts work with Latino/a culture-related organizations in Tompkins County like Cultura! No más lágrimas, and the Latino Civic Association. The core idea is that students will learn while participating in meaningful activities that will enhance arts and culture partnerships. Faculty will provide guidelines and resources for students to work within existing projects or to develop their own ideas; community partners will provide networks and planning assistance.  All students will be asked to develop a comprehensive learning portfolio on their semester’s work. Please contact Prof Castillo at dac9@cornell.edu with questions.

    View full course description
  • Hispanic Theatre Production

    Course No.
    LSP 3010 / COML 3010 / LATA 3010
    Instructor
    D. Castillo
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Students develop a specific dramatic text for full-scale production. The course involves selection of an appropriate text, close analysis of the literary aspects of the play, and group evaluation of its representational value and effectiveness. All students in the course are involved in some aspects of production of the play, and write a final paper as a course requirement. Credit is variable depending upon the student’s role in play production: a minimum of 50 hours of work is required for 1 credit; a maximum of 3 credits are awarded for 100 hours or more of work.

    View full course description
  • Cultures and Communities

    Course No.
    LSP 4300
    Instructor
    D. Castillo
    Format
    Lecture

    Conceived as a service-learning course, the centerpiece here is targeted, engaged research and arts work with Latino/a culture-related organizations in Tompkins County like Cultura! No más lágrimas, and the Latino Civic Association. The core idea is that students will learn while participating in meaningful activities that will enhance arts and culture partnerships. Faculty will provide guidelines and resources for students to work within existing projects or to develop their own ideas; community partners will provide networks and planning assistance. All students will be asked to develop a comprehensive learning portfolio on their semester’s work. Please contact Prof Castillo at dac9@cornell.edu with questions.

    View full course description