Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Integrating Theory and Practice I

    Course No.
    LA 3010
    Instructor
    M. Goula
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    The studio engages students in the design process based on a site defined by significant cultural and natural conditions.  The studio focuses on peripheral, yet complex sites of coastal cities, where the urbanizing force has not been strong or continuous enough in order to completely occupy or transform the maritime and/or fluvial ecosystems.  The sites involved will be often related to industrial or infrastructural abandonment and will include relevant underdeveloped, fragmented open spaces that interact both with the natural systems and the city.  The scarcity of water and a broad design history of the area are key conditions of the site’s location and the design approach.  The landscape approach here operates as  new humanistic lens that seeks to offer better habitat conditions for a wider range of species.

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  • Integrating Theory and Practice II

    Course No.
    LA 3020
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    This studio builds upon prior course work with an expectation that participants can creatively manipulate the program and conditions of a site or area, with increased emphasis on contemporary technology. The course focuses on the expression of design solutions that grow from and affirm an explicit sense of site and place. Social, cultural, physical, and historical factors and their relationship to site design and planning are critically explored through theory and practice.

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  • Urban Design Studio

    Course No.
    LA 4010
    Instructor
    J. Cerra
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    This studio focuses on the integration of theory and practice in landscape architecture at the urban scale. Urban design methods, morphology, and strategies are introduced and design and planning concepts applied to city-scaled projects including community engagement. Students are engaged in contemporary urban design strategies and methodologies on real-life projects in a metropolitain area.

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  • Capstone Studio

    Course No.
    LA 4020
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    Community and ecological infrastructure design studio.

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  • Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment

    Course No.
    LA 4910 / PLHRT 4910
    Instructor
    N. L. Bassuk, P. J. Trowbridge
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Focuses on the identification, uses, and establishment of woody plants in urban and garden settings. By understanding the environmental limitations to plant growth, students are able to critically assess potential planting sites; select appropriate trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers for a given site; and learn about the principles and practices of site amelioration and plant establishment. Design followed by written specifications and graphic details are developed to implement these practices. No prior design experience necessary.

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  • Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment

    Course No.
    LA 4920 / PLHRT 4920
    Instructor
    N. L. Bassuk, P. J. Trowbridge
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This is the second half of course focusing on the winter identification, uses, and establishment of woody plants in urban and garden settings. Issues of site assessment and soil remediation are emphasized in addition to soil volume calculations, drainage and surface detailing, and planting techniques. Students critically assess potential planting sites and select appropriate trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers for a given site. Design for specific sites followed by written specifications and graphic details are produced to implement these proposals. Students implement, in a hands-on manner, site remediation and planting techniques they have learned by creating new landscapes that serve to integrate theory, principles, and practices. Together, PLHRT 4910 and HORT 4920 constitute an integrated course.

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  • Composition and Theory I

    Course No.
    LA 5010
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    Introduction to landscape architectural design through a series of course modules that engage students in discovering, knowing and engaging the full potential of the landscape medium. In this process-oriented studio students will develop design proposals for real and imagined sites drawing on knowledge and principles from art, aesthetics, science, nature and culture. Each module sequence will also be integrated with the companion LA 5050 course and emphasize the unfolding and emergent nature of designerly thinking, making and doing.

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  • Composition and Theory II

    Course No.
    LA 5020
    Instructor
    V. Aymer
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    Studio course emphasizing the design process and principles ingenerating design ideas, concepts and plans.  The coruse focuses on the aestheties and functionality of site-specific design.

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  • Integrating Theory and Practice I

    Course No.
    LA 6010
    Instructor
    M. Glass, P. Trowbridge
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    This studio focuses upon urban, site-scaled projects that consider significant cultural landscapes. The course explores theories of urban design strategies, sustainable design, and landscape representation. These are explored through a semester-long project that is derived from specific site and place. The integration of site history as well as contemporary urban condition is explored that supports an understanding and relationship between theory and practice.

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  • Integrating Theory and Practice II

    Course No.
    LA 6020
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    This studio builds on prior course work with an expectation that participants can creatively manipulate the program and conditions of a site, with increased emphasis on contemporary technology and ‘best’ green practices. Projects focus upon the expression of design solutions that grow from and affirm an explicit sense of site and place. Social, cultural, physical, and historic factors and their relationship to site design and planning are critically explored through theory and practice.

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  • Urban Design and Planning

    Course No.
    LA 7010
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    This studio explores the application of urban design and landscape urbanism techniques to the problems and opportunities of contemporary city making. The studio investigates the social, cultural, natural, and infrastructural systems of urban environments, and develops integrated spatial design strategies involving water quality, public space, and flooding infrastructure. The course introduces three-dimensional computer modeling and digital design media as tools for urban design.

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  • Advanced Design Studio

    Course No.
    LA 7020
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    This advanced design studio provides students in the final year of the graduate program in Landscape Architecture with the opportunity to work on complex, real-time projects. The overarching goal of this course is to test the student’s theoretical, methodological, technical, and representational competency and ability to engage with a range of scales and issues. Through intensive studio work, seminar sessions, independent research, and site visits, students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to develop sound and creative solutions to environmental design problems.

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  • Hispanic Theatre Production

    Course No.
    LATA 3010 / COML 3010 / LSP 3010
    Instructor
    D. Castillo
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Students develop a specific dramatic text for full-scale production. The course involves selection of an appropriate text, close analysis of the literary aspects of the play, and group evaluation of its representational value and effectiveness. All students in the course are involved in some aspects of production of the play, and write a final paper as a course requirement. Credit is variable depending upon the student’s role in play production: a minimum of 50 hours of work is required for 1 credit; a maximum of 3 credits are awarded for 100 hours or more of work.

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  • Experience Latin America: Rural and Urban Realities I

    Course No.
    LATA 4010 / IARD 4010
    Instructor
    P. Hobbs
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Acquaints students with the cultural, historical, socio-political, literary, anthropological, health, agricultural, and development issues in southern Mexico. The lectures/discussions establish the global and regional contexts for better transcultural understanding. This course may be taken as a stand-alone course in international agriculture and rural development or in Latin American Studies. However, it is primarily a preparatory course for participants who plan to participate in a summer/fall course called Experience Latin America ll. Chiapas Eidtion (IARD 6010 or LATA 6010), which includes a two week field-study trip to southern Mexico (Chiapas during the summer). The two week field trip will also offer students the option to stay on in Chiapas (or other locations) for an extra 6-8 weeks to complete an international experience with a locally funded project tailored to student interest and background.

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  • Student-Community Partnerships in Ecuador I

    Course No.
    LATA 4011 / IARD 4011 / NTRES 4011
    Instructor
    J. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Links students with community partners in a mountainous region of Ecuador in preparation for a service-learning fieldtrip during Winter Break (IARD 6011). The course exposes students to local people who have rejected the prospect of open-pit mining, and instead are pursuing sustainable community-based conservation and enterprise development. Readings, multi-media, guest lectures, and facilitated discussions explore and deconstruct questions of power and privilege, social responsibility, environmental responsibility, civil disobedience, and social equity. Students collaborate directly with Ecuadorean partners during the semester to develop relevant projects. Topical areas for collaboration may include artisanal handicrafts, ecotourism, organic coffee, and/or community-based conservation.

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  • Experience Latin America II (Chiapa Edition)

    Course No.
    LATA 6010 / IARD 6010
    Instructor
    P. Hobbs
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Designed to provide students with an opportunity to observe the rich living cultures, environments, ecologies, rural and urban communities, and development issues in tropical southern Mexico. Also designed to promote interdisciplinary exchange among faculty, staff, and students and their Mexican hosts and counterparts. A two-week field-study trip in June is followed by discussions, written projects, and oral presentations dealing with a range of topics pertinent to the target cultures of Chiapas.

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  • Student-Community Partnerships in Ecuador II

    Course No.
    LATA 6011 / IARD 6011
    Instructor
    J. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This is the second part of the course (IARD 4011 or LATA 4011 is first taken in the fall) taken on return from Ecuador. Partners students with community practitioners in a rural region of Ecuador after preparing them during the IARD 4011 or LATA 4011 fall course for a service trip to Ecuador during Winter break. The class will expose students to a community that has rejected the prospect of open-pit mining, and instead attempted to create an alternative model of development focusing on artisan cooperatives, conservation initiatives, and sustainable agriculture. A series of guest lecturers from a wide range of disciplines will contextualize the case-study by addressing issues of sustainable development, community-based conservation, and resistance to extractive industries. Students will communicate directly with practitioners in Ecuador during the Fall semester and develop projects with their practitioners. Students will be able to choose between three topics: Design and Marketing for Artisanal Women’s Groups, Agroforestry and Ecoagriculture for a Shade-Grown Coffee Cooperative, and Ecological Conservation and Reserve Management for a local conservation.

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  • Cornell Prison Education Program Teaching Practicum

    Course No.
    LAW 6204
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Students in the Practicum will co-teach a law-related course at either Auburn or Cayuga correctional facilities, as part of the Cornell Prison Education Program (CPEP), which offers college courses to inmates working toward their associates’ degrees. Interested students should secure a full-time faculty advisor and submit a course proposal to the CPEP. Accepted students will design a detailed course syllabus, procure teaching materials, and teach a 2-hour class on a weekly basis. Students will also be expected to create, administer, and evaluate midterm and final examinations. Students must travel to and from a correctional facility on a weekly basis, at their own expense. Limited funds are available for teaching materials. Students who have secured a faculty advisor and who have received approval for their course from CPEP should direct inquiries about funding to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

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  • Family Law Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 6422
    Instructor
    C. G. Bowman
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will assist indigent clients in obtaining uncontested divorces and initial support orders. Skills learned include client interviewing and drafting pleadings, judgments, and other state-mandated forms.

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  • Family Law Clinic II

    Course No.
    LAW 6423
    Instructor
    C. Bowman
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Open to students who either have taken Family Law or are co-registered for it. Students will be assigned clients for whom they will draft all the documents necessary for an uncontested divorce and also assist with preparing support petitions to be filed pro se in Family Court.

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  • Asylum and Convention Against Torture Appellate Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7801
    Instructor
    S. Kalantry, S. W. Yale-Loehr
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will write appellate briefs to the Board of Immigration Appeals on behalf of clients who have petitioned to remain in the United States because they fear persecution or torture in their home countries. These clients will typically have represented themselves pro se in Immigration Court. During the first part of the semester students will learn substantive and procedural asylum and Convention Against Torture (CAT) law, such as the nature of persecution, grounds for asylum and CAT claims, and the practical and social effects that these laws have on new immigrants who seek asylum or CAT relief. Classes may also cover practical knowledge needed for effective representation, such as advanced research and writing skills. During the second part of the semester, students will work in teams of two on appellate briefs. These briefs will not only entail serious legal analysis, but may also require sociocultural and political research, so that the students can effectively write about the conditions of the client’s home country. Students will interview clients over the phone during this time, with the possibility of face-to-face interviews. Some clients may be incarcerated, and many will be out-of-state. Students may also locate expert and other witnesses, and draft affidavits and motions. The students’ cases will provide a basis for more in-depth substantive learning, as well as practical skills and attorney-client issues. In class, each team will also discuss the legal and practice issues that arise in their case, so that all students can benefit from and assist with each individual case.

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  • Capital Appellate Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7802
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students in this clinic will assist in the preparation of appellate briefs in selected capital cases. Students will work intensively with the record, research legal issues, and draft arguments.

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  • Advanced International Human Rights Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7803
    Instructor
    E. Brundige
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This course offers students who have completed the International Human Rights Clinic the opportunity to pursue one or more projects in conjunction with the Clinic, working in teams with other students enrolled in the advanced or regular Clinic. Students will gain experience in international human rights advocacy and develop human rights lawyering and leadership skills. Students will participate in regular project team and all-clinic meetings. In the spring semester, they will also participate in seminar sessions that are combined with the International Human Rights Clinic seminar.

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  • Advanced Labor Law Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7805
    Instructor
    A. Cornell
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The Advanced Labor Law Clinic provides students another opportunity to deepen their understanding of traditional labor and employment law by representing the interests of workers with typical workplace issues. There is no classroom component to this course. Students will dedicate their time to addressing client inquiries related to organizing, collective bargaining, unfair labor practice charges, the Family Medical Leave Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act or other workplace issues. Students may also have the opportunity to represent their clients in a case before the National Labor Relations Board, in mediation or arbitration pursuant to the dispute resolution mechanism in the collective bargaining agreement. In addition to the domestic labor law inquiries, interested students may have the opportunity to address international labor law topics as well. The international labor law work typically occurs in Latin America. During the semester, there will likely be two guest speakers and two panel discussions on timely labor law topics, which students will be required to attend, along with weekly meetings to discuss case preparation and advancement. In this course students will advance the following skills: interviewing, counseling, factual investigation, legal research and writing, problem-solving and depending on the assignment, trial preparation skills (direct and cross-examinations, opening statement and evidentiary arguments).

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  • Capital Punishment Clinic 1

    Course No.
    LAW 7811
    Instructor
    J. H. Blume, S. L. Johnson, K. M. Weyble
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Death penalty litigation: investigation and the preparation of petitions, memoranda, and briefs. This course is taught as a clinic. Two or possibly three capital cases are worked on by students. Case selection depends on both pedagogical factors and litigation needs of the inmates. Students read the record and research legal issues. Some students are involved in investigation, while others assist in the preparation of papers. All students are included in discussions regarding the necessary investigation, research, and strategy for the cases.

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  • Child Advocacy Clinic 1

    Course No.
    LAW 7812
    Instructor
    A. J. Mooney
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will participate in the representation of children who are the subject of family court proceedings. Cases are likely to involve children who are the subjects of petitions such as: abuse or neglect, custody, termination of parental rights, status offense and juvenile delinquency. Students will interview clients and their families, prepare documents such as pleadings, motions, pre-trial memos and proposed findings of fact, and participate in court conferences and hearings. The in-class component of the course will address cross-disciplinary concerns such as working with other professionals and using social science to assist a client. Additionally, the course will focus on child development and the particular ethical concerns involved with the representation of children.

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  • Child Advocacy Clinic II

    Course No.
    LAW 7813
    Instructor
    A. Mooney
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students in Clinic II will:1) work directly on law guardian cases, taking greater responsibility and working more independently than they are able to in the Child Advocacy Clinic I; 2) develop a more in-depth knowledge of the field of child advocacy by participating in a weekly reading group; 3) act as mentors for students in the Child Advocacy Clinic I, answering simple questions and providing emotional support for students who are often encountering, for the first time in their lives, stark poverty and violence; 4) act as liaisons between the students in the Child Advocacy Clinic I and the instructor, helping to identify areas in which the Clinic students need further instruction; 5) act as teaching assistants for Child Advocacy Clinic I, reviewing work products of the Clinic students and assisting them in locating research, formbooks, and samples of court documents.

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  • Capital Punishment Clinic 2

    Course No.
    LAW 7815
    Instructor
    J. H. Blume, S. L. Johnson, K. M. Weyble
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Death penalty litigation: investigation and the preparation of petitions, memoranda, and briefs. This course is taught as a clinic. Two or possibly three capital cases are worked on by students. Case selection depends on both pedagogical factors and litigation needs of the inmates. Students read the record and research legal issues. Some students are involved in investigation, while others assist in the preparation of papers. All students are included in discussions regarding the necessary investigation, research, and strategy for the cases.

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  • Externship – Full Time

    Course No.
    LAW 7832
    Instructor
    G. Galbreath
    Credits
    12
    Format
    Lecture

    The Externship – Full Time course allows students (24 in fall, 16 in spring) to earn 12 credit hours as externs working full time at approved placement sites at virtually any location (most sites are non-profit organizations or governmental agencies) during the fall or spring semester of their third year or the spring semester of their second year. The course purpose is to provide a bridge between the study of law and its practice. A written application for the course must be submitted to the instructor and approved during the semester preceding the semester the student plans to participate. The student must be supervised/mentored by an attorney and engage in meaningful and “attorney-like” work at the placement which furthers the student’s education and career goals. In addition to his or her work responsibilities for the placement, the extern will create a Learning Agenda, prepare weekly Journal entries, engage in a regular electronic Discussion Board with other externs and the instructor, host the instructor for a site visit, and do a written Description of Placement. See the BlackBoard web site for Externship – Full Time for more detail on these requirements.

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  • Criminal Defense Trial Clinic

    Course No.
    LAW 7833
    Instructor
    L. Salisbury
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students represent defendants in non-felony, non-jury criminal cases. The course has both a classroom and courtroom component. The classroom component focuses on all aspects of the handling of a criminal case, including criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial strategy, plea bargaining and trials. The courtroom component involves attendance at court proceedings, including pre-trial conferences. Each student potentially may interview clients and witnesses, and prepare clients and witnesses for trial. All students will conduct negotiations with the District Attorney’s Office, do legal research, conduct fact investigation, prepare discovery demands and engage in motion practice.

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