Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Capstone Project in Food Science

    Course No.
    FDSC 4000
    Instructor
    C. Lee
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to apply Food Science knowledge and skills to solve specific, real life technical problems incurred by food processors. Under the guidance of faculty mentors, teams consisting of 4 – 5 students will act as consultants for local industry partners working with the New York State Food Venture Center (NYSFVC).

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  • Agriculture in Developing Nations I

    Course No.
    FDSC 4020 / IARD 4020
    Instructor
    K. V. Raman, T. Tucker
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Acquaint students with the major issues and problems in international agriculture and rural development and to demonstrate how problems in development are being addressed in developing countires. The lectures/discussions establish the global and regional contexts for sustainable agricultural development and focus on development challenges in Asia through cases in India or Burma. This course may be taken as a stand-alone survey course in international agriculture and rural development. However, it is primarily a preparatory course for participants selected to participate in the spring-semester course Agriculture in the Developing Nations II (IARD 6020), which includes a field trip to India or burma during the January intersession.

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  • International Agriculture in Developing Nations

    Course No.
    FDSC 6020 / IARD 6020
    Instructor
    P. Parra, M. Pritts, K. V. Raman, S. Rizvi, T.Tucker
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to observe agricultural development in India or Myanmar and to promote interdisciplinary exchange among faculty, staff, students and their Indian Myanmaran counterparts. A three-week field-study trip in January (IARD 6015) is followed by this spring course that includes discussions, written projects, and oral presentations dealing with problems in food, agriculture, and livestock production in the context of social and economic conditions of India or Myanmar.

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  • Textiles, Apparel, and Innovation

    Course No.
    FSAD 4660
    Instructor
    J. Hinestroza
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Designed for students in all FSAD options. Explores the relationship between materials and design with a concentration on the use of innovative textile materials in apparel. Both aesthetic and functional issues are addressed. The course consists of a combination of lecture, discussion of readings, oral reports, a research paper, and project work.

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  • Abroad to Germany

    Course No.
    GERST 2002
    Instructor
    G. Matthias
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    This course prepares students to undertake a one-week research trip to Germany during spring semester. Students will choose and investigate a research topic that will allow them to delve into questions and practices relating to cultural communication. Possible topics include migrant and minority cultures; privacy and data protection; environmental conservation and the challenge of climate change. Besides the one-week travel the course involves pre- and post-travel sessions on the Cornell campus. The first part of the course is devoted to analyzing different ways of defining culture, as well as related concepts of inter- and transculturality, based primarily but not exclusively on the work of cultural anthropologist Joana Breidenbach. In the second part we will apply these theoretical concepts to the chosen research topic as we explore local contexts during the travel to Germany. Our post-travel sessions will be devoted to interrogating the mechanism and reach of stereotypical categorization and cultural claims in addition to assessing the outcomes of the research we conducted on the collaborative project. The aim of the course is to foster awareness of cultural difference and local contexts, as well as the critical ability to describe and question the stereotypical assumptions that underpin cultural identity.

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  • Community Outreach

    Course No.
    HD 2820 / PSYCH 2820
    Instructor
    H. Segal
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Provides students with information and perspectives essential to volunteer fieldwork with human and social service programs in the community. Readings are drawn from the field of community psychology and include analyses of successful programs, such as Head Start, as well as a review of the methods by which those programs are developed and assessed. Although students are not required to volunteer, the instructor provides students with a list of local agencies open to student placements.

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  • Fieldwork in Diversity and Professional Practice: The Culture of Medicine and Public Health

    Course No.
    HE 4060
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is part of the Urban Semester Program in New York City.  Over the course of the summer session, students learn through a cycle of experience and reflection.  Students learn how to implement experience-based learning techniques and perspectives to enhance their competencies as initiates of professional practice. Students spend four days each week in an internship of their own choosing. One day each week, students have discussions with professionals who represent different aspects of the New York City economy. This exposure enables students to explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices. Students participate in reflections seminars with the director of the program to explore student internship experiences and learning.

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  • Fieldwork in Diversity and Professional Practice: Community and Public Service

    Course No.
    HE 4080
    Instructor
    M. A. Cocchini
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is part of the Urban Semester Program in New York City. Students learn through a cycle of experience and reflection. Over the course of the summer session, students learn how to implement experience-based learning techniques and perspectives to enhance their competencies as initiates of professional practice. Students spend four days each week in an internship of their own choosing. One day each week, students have discussions with professionals who represent different aspects of the New York City economy. This exposure enables students to explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices. Students participate in reflections seminars with the director of the program to explore student internship experiences and learning.

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  • Fieldwork in Diversity and Professional Practice: Finance, Business, Law and Other Settings

    Course No.
    HE 4090
    Instructor
    M. A. Cocchini
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is part of the Urban Semester Program in New York City. Students learn through a cycle of experience and reflection. Over the course of the summer session, students learn how to implement experience-based learning techniques and perspectives to enhance their competencies as initiates of professional practice. Students spend four days each week in an internship of their own choosing. One day each week, students have discussions with professionals who represent different aspects of the New York City economy. This exposure enables students to explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices. Students participate in reflections seminars with the director of the program to explore student internship experiences and learning.

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  • Medical Anthropology

    Course No.
    HE 4901
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    This course explores ethnographic methods, an experiential methodology, as these are used in anthropological research with the idea of “improving the human condition.” Particular attention is paid on health and medical disparities and their resolution. Students are exposed to ethnographic methods and research from historical, philosophical and ethical perspectives as tools for experiential learning. We explore the contradictions inherent in fieldwork, such as participant observation and cultural relativism in producing experiential learning knowledge.

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  • Professional Practice and the World of Medicine

    Course No.
    HE 4902 / ANTHR 4902
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    By implementing ethnographic methods students in the Urban Semester Program surface medical culture in their rotations and presence in hospital environments.  These methods include historical analysis, oral history, participant observation, participatory methods, formal and informal interviews, and additional mechanisms to generate data.  The focus of their exploration is based on disparities in health and medicine. By the end of the semester, students investigate the nature of medical professional practice by carrying out library research, observations, and informal interviews with medical practitioners in both New York Presbyterian and Woodhull hospitals.  In this course students extend their capacity for self-direction and produce their own ethnography of medical practice.  This may be an examination of medical culture, or the culture of a particular specialization, or an exploration of a particular topic in social medicine or public health.

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  • Community Participation and Service in North Brooklyn

    Course No.
    HE 4903
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    North Brooklyn is an area of New York City that is undergoing dramatic changes impacting different communities that share the area differently. This Urban Semester course is organized to inform students about this part of New York City as an iconic example of how life is lived among people who experienced the socioeconomic developments of the City since the departure of manufacturing, white ethnic abandonment, the repopulation of the area by people of color and their struggle to sustain their communities of color during the current era of gentrification.  Students will engage people in the community that is most vulnerable to displacement and come to understand their circumstances by participating with members of community-based organizations. In this course students will debate the difference between “charity” and “participation” and develop their own notions about how to lead a “good life” by serving others. The experiences students have in North Brooklyn serve to inform them about how disparities are lived in as a real-world experience.

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  • Experience Based Learning in Corporate and Public Sector Internships

    Course No.
    HE 4921
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    In this Urban Semester Course, students learn through a cycle of experience and reflection.  Over the course of the semester, students learn how to implement experience-based learning techniques and perspectives to enhance their competencies as initiates of professional practice in careers of their choosing.  One day each week, the students have discussions with professionals who represent different aspects of the New York City economy.  This exposure enables students to explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices.

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  • Immersion in the City and Community Engagement

    Course No.
    HE 4922
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    The world of work and professional practice does not function in isolation to the society in which we live.  Therefore it is important to contextualize work experience with a more engaged role in the life of urban communities around us.  Community Action Inquiry provides a lens through which to understand the conditions and disparities that surround us in New York City.  Each semester, students work with residents and leadership within an urban neighborhood to investigate an issue of importance identified by the community, and co-construct solutions that they can act upon and learn from. Students use the participatory action research (PAR) strategy to engage communities through service learning.

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  • Professional Practice and Leadership

    Course No.
    HE 4923 / ANTHR 4923
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    In this course, students examine the nature of service as integral to all forms of practice, whether in a professional career, in community leadership roles, or in personal life.  In this course service is a way of being in practice in all parts of life, rather than a community activity or act of charity seen as adjunct to “real life work.” Service is practiced in a multiplicity of contexts: in the corporate sector, in the non-profit sector, in legal or social services, through nutrition programs or in community organizations.  Social responsibility in and through work has become an essential part of professional practice and leadership in the 21st century. Through readings, seminar discussions and weekly reflection papers, as well as guest speakers from a variety of professions, students explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices as these relate to service in their future careers and leadership roles.

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  • Understanding Global Capitalism Through Service Learning

    Course No.
    HIST 2006 / AMST 2016 / ASRC 2006
    Instructor
    E. Baptist
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is a seminar focused on a service-learning approach to understanding the history of neoliberal transformations of the global economy through the lens of an island (Jamaica) and a community (Petersfield.) Building on the success of last year’s global service-learning course and trip to Petersfield, and now bringing the course under the auspices of both the Engaged Cornell and Cornell Abroad administrative and funding capabilities. Students will attend class each week and will also take a one-week service trip over spring break to work with the local community partner (AOC) in Petersfield. We will also work with Amizade, a non-profit based in Pittsburgh, who is the well-established partner of the AOC and which works with numerous universities on global service learning projects.

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  • Global Capitalism in One Community

    Course No.
    HIST 2007 / AMST 2017 / ASRC 2007
    Instructor
    E. Baptist
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will learn about the history and culture of one Jamaican community and its changing historical relationship to the world economy through a three-week trip to Petersfield Jamaica. While there, they will attend class sessions, participate in service activities determined by the community, study local sugar production and labor and their relationship to the global economy on the ground, and conduct oral history interviews with local residents. They will live in homestays, work closely with a local community partner, attend community self-governance meetings, and the oral history texts they generate will be curated for a local archive. This course will be structured according to the principles of fair trade service learning.

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  • Immigrant Ithaca

    Course No.
    HIST 2252 / AMST 2252 / LSP 2252
    Instructor
    M. C. Garcia
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This engaged learning course allows students to combine community service with academic learning. Students will learn about the post-1965 immigration to the United States, and especially to Ithaca and upstate New York. We will examine the reasons for migration, the policies that facilitated entry, and the particular needs of immigrant populations in the local setting. Because this course is a seminar there is a strong emphasis on the discussion of the weekly readings, and class participation weighs heavily in the assessment of the final grade. A key component of this course is the community service project. In consultation with the professor, students will identify and work on individual service projects in the local community and must agree to commit a minimum of 3-4 hours per week to their project. In the past, students have worked with a number of local organizations including the Immigrant Services Program at Catholic Charities; the Tompkins County Living Wage Coalition & Workers’ Rights Center; the BOCES ESL Program; the Translator Program; and the Cornell Friends of the Farmworkers.

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  • Worldly Explorations: Gateway to Engaged International Experiences for Undergraduates

    Course No.
    IARD 2050 / NTRES 2050
    Instructor
    J. Lassoie
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    This discussion-based course introduces opportunities for international study available to juniors and seniors. Grounded in experiential learning through community engagement, public service, and leadership training, guest faculty and students discuss stimulating real-world learning experiences arising from a variety of courses and semesters abroad that include fieldwork in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Opportunities for academic coursework beyond Cornell and for research and practical internships are also discussed. The course provides an opportunity for students to develop a personalized plan of study that matches their personal and professional aspirations. Such preparation might include combinations of area and language studies; training in community engagement, public service, and/or leadership; international travel workshops, specialized coursework, and/or research methodological development.

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  • Experience Latin America: Rural and Urban Realities I

    Course No.
    IARD 4010 / LATA 4010
    Instructor
    P. Hobbs
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Acquaints students with the cultural, historical, socio-political, literary, anthropological, health, agricultural, and development issues in southern Mexico. The lectures/discussions establish the global and regional contexts for better transcultural understanding. This course may be taken as a stand-alone course in international agriculture and rural development or in Latin American Studies. However, it is primarily a preparatory course for participants who plan to participate in a summer/fall course called Experience Latin America ll. Chiapas Eidtion (IARD 6010 or LATA 6010), which includes a two week field-study trip to southern Mexico (Chiapas during the summer). The two week field trip will also offer students the option to stay on in Chiapas (or other locations) for an extra 6-8 weeks to complete an international experience with a locally funded project tailored to student interest and background.

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  • Student-Community Partnerships in Ecuador I

    Course No.
    IARD 4011 / LATA 4011 / NTRES 4011
    Instructor
    J. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Links students with community partners in a mountainous region of Ecuador in preparation for a service-learning fieldtrip during Winter Break (IARD 6011). The course exposes students to local people who have rejected the prospect of open-pit mining, and instead are pursuing sustainable community-based conservation and enterprise development. Readings, multi-media, guest lectures, and facilitated discussions explore and deconstruct questions of power and privilege, social responsibility, environmental responsibility, civil disobedience, and social equity. Students collaborate directly with Ecuadorean partners during the semester to develop relevant projects. Topical areas for collaboration may include artisanal handicrafts, ecotourism, organic coffee, and/or community-based conservation.

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  • Agriculture in Developing Nations I

    Course No.
    IARD 4020 / FDSC 4020
    Instructor
    K. V. Raman, T. Tucker
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Acquaint students with the major issues and problems in international agriculture and rural development and to demonstrate how problems in development are being addressed in developing countires. The lectures/discussions establish the global and regional contexts for sustainable agricultural development and focus on development challenges in Asia through cases in India or Burma. This course may be taken as a stand-alone survey course in international agriculture and rural development. However, it is primarily a preparatory course for participants selected to participate in the spring-semester course Agriculture in the Developing Nations II (IARD 6020), which includes a field trip to India or burma during the January intersession.

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  • Case Studies in International Ecoagriculture and Environmental Conservation

    Course No.
    IARD 4850 / ESS 4850 / NTRES 4850
    Instructor
    J. P. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course has been designed for students interested in applying their accumulated knowledge and experiences to interdisciplinary, real-world problems facing food and fiber production, environmental conservation, and sustainable development worldwide. Early in the course we will examine through readings, websites, and facilitated discussions the complexity of ‘wicked’ problems and how best to address their possible solutions, develop team-working skills, and briefly review contemporary case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the U.S. Guest discussion leaders will be involved as appropriate. The majority of semester will be dedicated to a team exercise that will systematically develop a detailed plan for designing, managing, and monitoring a field-based integrated conservation and development project for a student-selected case study scenario. This approach will provide a set of tools that can be readily adapted for developing conservation and sustainable development projects in many different international and domestic settings. Active in-class participation and out-of-class work is expected and a final written team report and class presentation are required.

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  • Experience Latin America II (Chiapa Edition)

    Course No.
    IARD 6010 / LATA 6010
    Instructor
    P. Hobbs
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Designed to provide students with an opportunity to observe the rich living cultures, environments, ecologies, rural and urban communities, and development issues in tropical southern Mexico. Also designed to promote interdisciplinary exchange among faculty, staff, and students and their Mexican hosts and counterparts. A two-week field-study trip in June is followed by discussions, written projects, and oral presentations dealing with a range of topics pertinent to the target cultures of Chiapas.

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  • Student-Community Partnerships in Ecuador II

    Course No.
    IARD 6011/ LATA 6011
    Instructor
    J. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This is the second part of the course (IARD 4011 or LATA 4011 is first taken in the fall) taken on return from Ecuador. Partners students with community practitioners in a rural region of Ecuador after preparing them during the IARD 4011 or LATA 4011 fall course for a service trip to Ecuador during Winter break. The class will expose students to a community that has rejected the prospect of open-pit mining, and instead attempted to create an alternative model of development focusing on artisan cooperatives, conservation initiatives, and sustainable agriculture. A series of guest lecturers from a wide range of disciplines will contextualize the case-study by addressing issues of sustainable development, community-based conservation, and resistance to extractive industries. Students will communicate directly with practitioners in Ecuador during the Fall semester and develop projects with their practitioners. Students will be able to choose between three topics: Design and Marketing for Artisanal Women’s Groups, Agroforestry and Ecoagriculture for a Shade-Grown Coffee Cooperative, and Ecological Conservation and Reserve Management for a local conservation.

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  • International Agriculture in Developing Nations

    Course No.
    IARD 6020 / FDSC 6020
    Instructor
    P. Parra, M. Pritts, K. V. Raman, S. Rizvi, T.Tucker
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to observe agricultural development in India or Myanmar and to promote interdisciplinary exchange among faculty, staff, students and their Indian Myanmaran counterparts. A three-week field-study trip in January (IARD 6015) is followed by this spring course that includes discussions, written projects, and oral presentations dealing with problems in food, agriculture, and livestock production in the context of social and economic conditions of India or Myanmar.

    View full course description
  • Composition and Form in Site-Specific Design

    Course No.
    LA 2010
    Instructor
    V. Aymer
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    Studio course emphasizing the design process and principles involved in organizing and giving form to outdoor space to create site-specific design.

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  • Medium of the Landscape II

    Course No.
    LA 2020
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    Focuses on the role of materials and natural systems in design at multiple scales.  Design strategies, theory and vocabulary in landscape architecture and allied disciplines are explored within the projects.

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  • Fieldwork in Urban Archaeology

    Course No.
    LA 2610 / ARKEO 2610 / CRP 2610
    Instructor
    S. Baugher
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Urban archaeologists study American Indian, colonial, and 19th-century sties that now lie within the boundaries of modern cities. The course explores how urban centers evolve, what lies beneath today’s cities, and how various cultures have altered the urban landscape. Students participate in a local, historical archaeological excavation.

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  • Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology

    Course No.
    LA 2620 / ARKEO 2620
    Instructor
    S. Baugher
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.

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