Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • StudioShift

    Course No.
    DEA 2203
    Instructor
    R. Gilmore
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Temporal spaces dominate the interior landscape at this point in history, reflecting the fleeting nature of information in a society consumed with momentary experiences. This studio will both expand and contract notions of spatial/environmental communication through brand-forward environments, exhibit-forward environments, and social advocacy experience.

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  • Healthy Places: Design, Planning and Public Health

    Course No.
    DEA 2700
    Instructor
    N. Wells
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Drawing from public health, environmental psychology, design, urban planning , architecture and landscape architecture, we examine how the physical environment influences health and health behaviors. We consider various contexts from rooms and buildings to parks and cities. Outcomes include physical and mental health, diet, physical activity and obesity.

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  • Health and Healing Studio

    Course No.
    DEA 3304
    Instructor
    M. Shepley
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Balancing the needs of patients experiencing acute health issues with the systematic needs of a variety of medical professionals requires spatial environments that must nurture the human spirit.  Environmental influences can create both efficient and effective healing mechanisms that not only treat the patient, but restore the body’s ability to heal.  In this studio, students will utilize spatial constructs that establish code-compliance, critical adjacencies, workflow circulation, and formulate health care facilities that employ evidence-based design principles.

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  • Problem-Seeking through Programming

    Course No.
    DEA 3590
    Instructor
    L. Maxwell
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    An architectural program is used to define the design problem, guide the design process and evaluate design solutions.  Students will develop skills in preparing a program while keeping in mind the potential audiences.  This course emphasizes the role of social science research and environment – behavior interaction in facility planning and in the design process.

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  • Adaptive Reuse Studio: Recycling the Built Environment

    Course No.
    DEA 4401
    Instructor
    R. Gilmore
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Economic forces have created the need for the adaptive reuse of existing structures vs new construction throughout the built environment.  Utilizing sustainable principles and the LEED rating system, this comprehensive studio challenges students to complete all phases of a historic preservation project using an historic structure in the region.  Site visits for building assessments, professional practice tutorials, and seminars on preservation enable students to develop a holistic understanding of how a building thinks and learns over time.

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  • Policy Meets Design: High-Impact Facilities of the 21st Century

    Course No.
    DEA 4500
    Instructor
    R. Sagha Zadeh
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Active participation from industry leaders including design firms and healthcare providers, students examine how optimized design and policy empower people, organizations, and communities to achieve their health-related operational and business objectives.  Students apply the lessons from high-impact healthcare facilities to their specific area of interest (e.g. senior living, healthcare, hospitality, education, housing, landscape, and urban planning).

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  • Workplace Strategies Studio

    Course No.
    DEA 5540
    Instructor
    Y. Hua
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This course provides students with a unique “hands-on” experience of working with real clients to simulate workplace strategic consulting practice.  Students will learn and apply concepts, techniques (both strategic and tactical), and tools to plan, design, evaluate and reinvent workplaces to support the achievement of ambitious business goals, inspire today’s connected and mobile knowledge workers, facilitate the management of uncertainty and change in large complex organizations, and envision future work modes and its implications for the creation of future workplace.  Professional communication in multiple forms and settings for effective client interaction and project development is also emphasized.

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  • Problem-Seeking through Programming

    Course No.
    DEA 6500
    Instructor
    L. Maxwell
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Each student is required to attend DEA 3590 lectures, complete all required readings and assignments, and meet with the instructor and with other graduate students. An additional programming project is required for all graduate students.

    An architectural program is used to define the design problem, guide the design process and evaluate design solutions.  Students will develop skills in preparing a program while keeping in mind the potential audiences.  This course emphasizes the role of social science research and environment – behavior interaction in facility planning and in the design process.

     

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  • Global Garbage

    Course No.
    DSOC 2030
    Instructor
    L. Leonard
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    In this course we will look at garbage, or waste, as a lens for thinking about consumption, value, inequality, and marginalization at home and around the globe. One definition of waste is matter that has no value. As such, waste is a powerful signifier. What we throw out tells us something about ourselves and the societies we live in. Waste has the capacity to mark people and places, to shape subjectivities, and to contribute to the marginalization of occupational groups and affected communities. But people also have the capacity to transform waste and to find new and creative uses for discarded objects, infusing them with value once again. Waste is good to think with when exploring a broad range of sociological themes.

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  • Farmworkers: Contemporary Issues and Their Implications

    Course No.
    DSOC 3060
    Instructor
    M. J. Dudley
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    The course examines issues related to primarily unauthorized immigrant workers, in particular immigrant farmworkers and their perceptions on their role in agriculture, their socio-economic interactions, labor concerns, opportunities for advancement in agriculture, and concerns stemming from the context in which they live.  Students will examine sociological issues (immigration detentions, farmworker access to health, education and other services, labor concerns, on-farm chemical safety issues, and integration into new home communities, pests), with particular emphasis on developing educational materials for farmworkers. Students will analyze data collected through interviews and focus groups, and examine participatory research methodologies. 

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  • Community Development Seminar

    Course No.
    DSOC 3090 / CRP 3090
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Introduction to the theory, method, and practice of contemporary community development. Topics include the role community-based organizations play in promoting sustainable development; enhancing the organizational capacity of community-based organizations; and the interplay between neighborhood-based community development activities and regional economic development policy-making.

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  • Agriculture, Food, Sustainability and Social Justice

    Course No.
    DSOC 3400
    Instructor
    R. Bezner Kerr
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    How is our food produced: where, by whom and under what conditions? What are the major trends and drivers of the agriculture and food system? How has our agriculture and food system changed over time? What are some of the environmental, social, nutritional and health implications of our food system? In this course we will use a sociological perspective to examine the social, political, economic and environmental aspects of agriculture and food. We will consider the historical background to our food and agricultural system, and will look at different agriculture and food issues in the Global North and South. We will also examine examples of alternative agriculture and food approaches and concepts, such as food sovereignty, agroecology, food justice, fair trade and community-supported agriculture, all of which attempt to support more sustainable, socially equitable agriculture and food systems. Engaged, critical learning is encouraged, including regular field trips for hands-on learning, guest speakers and films as well as discussions and lecture-based classes.

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  • Senior Capstone Course

    Course No.
    DSOC 4700
    Instructor
    Fall, L. Leonard; spring, S. Peters.
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The course is required for all Development Sociology majors and will be limited to DSOC majors and minors who will take the course in the second semester of their junior year or sometime during their senior year. The objective of this course is to synthesize and recapitulate the development sociology major for majors or minors. This objective is implemented by reading and discussing thematic content areas of the major including state, economy and society; population and development; the food system and society; and environment and society. The course requires a term paper (senior honors theses can substitute for these) and in-class presentations of student work.
    .

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  • Agents of Change: Community Organizing for the Public Good

    Course No.
    DSOC 4820 / NTRES 4820 / PMA 4820
    Instructor
    S. Peters
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Democracy is more than a system of government. It’s a way of life. It’s a kind of politics that involves the development and exercise of power and the performance of civic roles on and off public stages. How can we achieve the promise of democracy in today’s world? How can we engage in public work as effective and ethical change agents of change? And how can we build and sustain a public culture that develops and honors the knowledge, talents, capacities, and expertise of a diverse population? We will take these questions up together in this course through case studies, personal experiences, readings, narrative interviews, skill-building workshops, and field trips.

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  • Community Development Seminar

    Course No.
    DSOC 5090 / CRP 5090
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Introduction to the theory, method, and practice of contemporary community development. Topics include the role community-based organizations play in promoting sustainable development; enhancing the organizational capacity of community-based organizations; and the interplay between neighborhood-based community development activities and regional economic development policy-making.

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  • Conservation Oceanography

    Course No.
    EAS 3510 / BIOEE 3510
    Instructor
    C. Greene, D. Harvell
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Focuses on field methods used to study marine organisms and ecosystems in efforts to sustain them in the face of many environmental challenges. Introduces students to modern techniques of marine-ecosystems research, including bioacoustics, ecological survey methods, and experimental marine ecology. This course is field and laboratory intensive with students engaged in hands-on, active learning that takes advantage of local resources.

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  • Introduction to Adult Learning: A Clasp Education Workshop

    Course No.
    EDUC 2200
    Instructor
    A. L. Raymer
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Do adults learn differently than do youth?   This experiential and community-engaged course is for anyone interested in planning and facilitating adult, community and lifelong learning.  As inquirers ourselves, we not only study principles, theories and methods, we also put into practice what we learn. One of the ways we do this is by incorporating adult learning approaches within the seminar’s design and educational practice (andragogy, rather than pedagogy). Another way we apply what we study is by mentoring adult learners.  Each student serves as a learning partner to a Cornell employee who is pursuing an educational aim. A journey of mutual learning is a satisfying and meaningful adventure. As employees’ partners, we are co-learners and co-educators, recognizing that each person has knowledge and experience to bring to the quest.  and experience to bring to the quest.

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  • Methods and Contexts of Adult and Community Learning: Leading and Teaching with Purpose

    Course No.
    EDUC 2210
    Instructor
    A. L. Raymer
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    In Methods and Contexts of Adult Learning & Community Learning,  we look for commonalities across a variety of venues and settings where people meet together to learn, deliberate, and act. From professional development to social change, town hall to union hall, or citizen science to workplace training, adult and community learning is everywhere. Yet, for many, the design and facilitation of meaningful learning experiences can be a s mysterious as an unopened black box. How does one go about creating inclusive educational experiences for diverse learners in our increasingly interconnected context?  In this course we open the box to become better leaders of learning and action.  A democatic and socially just society should enable all of its citizens to develop their potential to the full and to have the capacity, individually and collectively, to meet the challenge of change.  Through learning, people can come to make a real contribution to their own communities and participate in local and national democratic processes.  Two of the most ubiquitous formats of adult learning are 1) the workshop, and 2) one-on-one mentoring. As a backwards design approach and interactive facilitation principles can serve each application well, we will learn and practice both! In this course you will a) design and facilitate workshops, and b) mentor a Cornell employee as they pursues a learning goal, and do both by learning and applying design process and facilitation arts.  Meaningful. Practical. Fun.

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  • The Art of Teaching

    Course No.
    EDUC 2410
    Instructor
    J. A. Perry
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This exploratory course is designed for students of all backgrounds and interests who have a desire to learn more about education and teaching. Teaching takes place in a variety of contexts from the family to the workplace, and this course endeavors to examine the elements of teaching that transcend the typical school-teaching environment. Designed to guide students in reflecting upon their experiences to help them better understand the decisions they make as teachers. Students have the opportunity to pursue their own interests through a teaching fieldwork assignment. Possible field experiences range from large group to tutorial situations, from preschool to adult education, from traditional school subject matters to recreational and occupational areas, and from school-based to nonformal situations. The course work and readings are designed to build on these experiences throughout the semester and provide concepts and skills to apply in the field.

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  • The Intergroup Dialogue Project

    Course No.
    EDUC 2610
    Instructor
    A. Grabiner Keinan
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Discussion

    The Intergroup Dialogue Project (IDP) at Cornell is a structured, peer facilitated course offering an opportunity for students to develop the skills of/for dialogue in complex and dynamic social and institutional contexts. Students meet in intimate, small group settings to explore personal and social identity formation while examining historical, psychological, and sociological course readings. More broadly IDP fosters a critical awareness of the ways in which sexism, heterosexism, religious intolerance and racism disable social justice and undermine deliberative democracy. Through a variety of in class exercises, written assignments and collaborative action projects students engage, analyze and develop the skills of dialogue for effective communication across social differences in highly diverse social contexts.

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  • Program Planning in Agriculture and Education

    Course No.
    EDUC 3320
    Instructor
    J. Perry
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Organization and planning processes for public school agricultural education.  Local needs assessments, advisory committees, community-partnering, course development, sequencing instruction, professional development.  Fieldwork required.

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  • Youth Organizations and Leadership Development

    Course No.
    EDUC 3350
    Instructor
    J. Perry
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Participants learn how to facilitate both youth and adult volunteer leadership development. They examine factors affecting membership, purposes, design, operation, and administration of youth organizations.

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  • Engaging Youth in Learning

    Course No.
    EDUC 4040
    Instructor
    B. Duff
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students study and apply key concepts and principles in curriculum design, assessment, and teaching. The focus is pre-teen and adolescent learners. In required fieldwork (2 hours weekly), students will use what they are learning to plan and run an after-school program on story-telling through film for local middle school students. (No prior knowledge of film required.)ired.)

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  • Program Planning in Agriculture and Education

    Course No.
    EDUC 5320
    Instructor
    J. Perry
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Organization and planning processes for public school agricultural education.  Local needs assessments, advisory committees, community-partnering, course development, sequencing instruction, professional development.  Fieldwork required.

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  • Youth Organizations and Leadership Development

    Course No.
    EDUC 5350
    Instructor
    J. Perry
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Participants learn how to facilitate both youth and adult volunteer leadership development. They examine factors affecting membership, purposes, design, operation, and administration of youth organizations.

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  • Advanced Program Planning and Youth Organizations in Agricultural Science Education

    Course No.
    EDUC 5370
    Instructor
    J. Perry
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Advanced development of the organization and planning processes necessary to operate a successful agricultural science education program in the public schools. Interaction with state and national resources, implementation strategies will be researched. Models of engagement identified and developed in preparation for entry into the field of teaching. Fieldwork provides experience with New York agricultural education students, teachers, and curriculum development for new programs.

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  • Applied Engineering Leadership

    Course No.
    ENGRG 3910
    Instructor
    E. Dawson
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Weekly experiential learning about different aspects of leadership and teamwork. Exercises are fun and engaging, sometimes taking students outside of the lab to experiment with different “people skills.” Topics include communication, decision-making for leaders, managing conflict, ethics, influence and persuasion, organizational culture, and others.

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  • Naturalist Outreach Practicum

    Course No.
    ENTOM 3350
    Instructor
    L. S. Rayor
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    An interdisciplinary course on how to do effective scientific outreach in environmental biology. The goals of the course are 1) to train students to speak about science with passion and clarity, 2) for the students to be able to teach science effectively in classrooms, science centers, and in large community outreach events, and 3) to train a generation of civically engaged scientific outreach leaders. Students participate in the ‘Naturalist Outreach Program’ to give STEM presentations on understanding nature to students throughout CNY. Class size is limited. Students who wish to enroll should read blogs.cornell.edu/naturalistoutreach and contact the instructor with information on your biological passion, background, and reason for taking the class.

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  • Naturalist Outreach Continued

    Course No.
    ENTOM 3360
    Instructor
    L. S. Rayor
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    If you have already taken ENTOM 3350, you can continue to do outreach in the community for credit. Open only to students who have already taken ENTOM 3350.

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  • Case Studies in International Ecoagriculture and Environmental Conservation

    Course No.
    ESS 4850 / IARD 4850 / NTRES 4850
    Instructor
    J. P. Lassoie
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course has been designed for students interested in applying their accumulated knowledge and experiences to interdisciplinary, real-world problems facing food and fiber production, environmental conservation, and sustainable development worldwide. Early in the course we will examine through readings, websites, and facilitated discussions the complexity of ‘wicked’ problems and how best to address their possible solutions, develop team-working skills, and briefly review contemporary case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the U.S. Guest discussion leaders will be involved as appropriate. The majority of semester will be dedicated to a team exercise that will systematically develop a detailed plan for designing, managing, and monitoring a field-based integrated conservation and development project for a student-selected case study scenario. This approach will provide a set of tools that can be readily adapted for developing conservation and sustainable development projects in many different international and domestic settings. Active in-class participation and out-of-class work is expected and a final written team report and class presentation are required.

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