Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Biology Senior Study Group Leader Training and Teaching Experience

    Course No.
    BIOG 4982
    Instructor
    A. MacNeill
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Course offers training and experience as undergraduate senior study group leaders (senior SGLs) in the biology core courses. Senior SGLs will meet weekly for training in collaborative, student-centered, active learning methods, facilitated by trainers from the Cornell Learning Strategies Center. Senior SGLs will facilitate one weekly study group meeting. Senior SGLs will also help train, observe, and mentor study group leaders. Senior SGLs will also provide office hour tutoring at the Biology Learning Strategies Center, and assist with some administrative functions. Senior SGLs will be evaluated on their participation in weekly training meetings, their mentoring and observations of SGLs, mid-semester and end-of-semester evaluations, and written work, including weekly lesson plans, +–? evaluation sheets, and end-of-semester reports.

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  • Social Issues in Community Engagement by Cancer Scientists

    Course No.
    BIOMS 5660
    Instructor
    K. Richards, R. Weiss
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    The goal of this intensive weekend workshop is to provide students an understanding of social issues of relevance to cancer patients. Topics to be covered will include: decision making and emotional issues for cancer patients; drug pricing and the costs of cancer therapy for individuals and society; community-based cancer advocacy; and patient rights and privacy issues.

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  • Community-based Cancer Research Presentations and Discussions

    Course No.
    BIOMS 5665
    Instructor
    B. Lewenstein, K. Richards, R. Weiss
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    This seminar series will provide a forum for interactions between cancer research trainees and cancer patients. Through this course, students will meet and interact with cancer patients and develop skills in communicating science to the public.

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  • Science Policy Bootcamp: Concept to Conclusion

    Course No.
    BME 4440
    Instructor
    C. Schaffer
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Science Policy Bootcamp: Concept to Conclusion, is an interdisciplinary service-learning course where students will explore the trends that shape science and innovation policy, understand core science policy concepts and engage in active policymaking work. This three-credit course will comprise of a three-hour long session that will meet every week. The first hour of each session will be devoted to broadening student’s perspective on science policy. The following two hours will be spent working in groups on the primary activity of the course – a science policy advocacy project that builds over the full semester. Working in small groups, students will identify a key science policy issue. Together, they will thoroughly research the issue and contact key stakeholders, formulate a detailed plan to address the issue, and unique to this course – implement their plan for solving the problem toward the end of the semester. Examples may include drafting legislation, commenting on Federal or State rulemaking procedures, launching public outreach campaigns, or raising press awareness of an issue. This aspect of the course will include both mentored work in developing the idea and advocacy plan, as well as activities to build the skills necessary to be an effective policy advocate. Examples of such activities include mock press interviews and lobbying visits. As a result of the final project – students will have the unique opportunity to address a bona fide policy issue and create a working solution.

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  • Clinical Preceptorship for Biomedical Engineers

    Course No.
    BME 5100
    Instructor
    N. de Faria, R. Karpman
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Preceptorship, is a well-known process in healthcare education and described as a short term relationship between a student as novice and an experienced health care professional, who provides individual attention to the student’s learning needs within a clinical environment. The BME 5100 leverages this methodology and enable our students to experience the dynamics of a clinical environment, observe the routine practice of a clinician, identify potential needs, and through a formal process evaluate the merits and provide ideas on how to address these perceived needs. The instructor will educate the students about the clinical environment, dress and behavior code, interaction with hospital staff and patients, as well as monitor and manage each student-preceptor team. The instructor and other engineering faculty will also review the student’s experiences and assist in any assignments the preceptor may have given to the student. The preceptor will guide the student with in depth knowledge of the related anatomy, physiology and pathology associated with his specialty. The preceptor will also provide the student the ability to participate and observe as well as generate weekly assignments. The sponsoring institution and the preceptors are very interested in the identified problems, the ideas resultant of the process, and how these ideas could be addressed by applying principles of engineering. The student will provide feedback in the form of a final report as well as an on-site poster presentation at the end of the academic year. The merited ideas will be placed in the pipeline for the sponsored design projects (BME 5910, BME 5920).

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  • Immersion Experience in Medical Research and Clinical Practice

    Course No.
    BME 7160
    Instructor
    Y. Wang
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    Summer immersion at Weill Medical College. Students participate in lectures, rounds, and seminars; observe surgeries; and solve medical problems presented by the staff.

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  • Learning Where You Live: Building Energy, Autopsy, Engineering and Behavioral Approach

    Course No.
    CEE 1010
    Instructor
    H. Chong
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will go “behind the walls” to understand why some buildings use less energy than others. Retrofitting America’s buildings is a key part of US sustainability strategy, but efforts are stalled. Take this course and find out why. In this hands-on class, you will (1) visit real buildings and “dissect” them to understand how buildings work, (2) investigate how government policies successfully and unsuccessfully promote retrofits, and (3) talk to real homeowners to see what they are really thinking.

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  • AguaClara: Sustainable Water Supply Project

    Course No.
    CEE 2550
    Instructor
    M. L. Weber-Shirk
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Student teams conduct research, build working models, design full-scale prototypes, create design algorithms, and create educational materials for technology transfer to improve drinking water quality in the Global South. Students in CEE 2550 learn in an apprenticeship role on teams led by students in CEE 4550 or CEE 5051/CEE 5052. For more information, see aguaclara.cee.cornell.edu.

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  • Special Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Course No.
    CEE 3090
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    Supervised study by individuals or groups of upper-division students on an undergraduate project or on specialized topics not covered in regular courses.

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  • AguaClara: Sustainable Water Supply Project

    Course No.
    CEE 4550
    Instructor
    M. L. Weber-Shirk
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Student teams conduct research, build working models, design full-scale prototypes, create design algorithms, and create educational materials for technology transfer to improve drinking water quality in the Global South. For more information see aguaclara.cee.cornell.edu.

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  • Environmental Engineering in an International Context I

    Course No.
    CEE 4560
    Instructor
    M. L. Weber-Shirk
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The course connects the themes of culture, society, and water infrastructure in the context of the global south. The goal of the course is to offer students an experiential learning experience, working with AguaClara partner organizations and civil society organizations in emerging markets and economically disadvantaged communities. Students will learn about the challenges and opportunities of creating sustainable infrastructure, institutional networks, and technical backstopping for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Students will read about development theory and the social, political, and historical context of Honduras. During the January intersession students travel to Honduras for an intensive engineering in context experience.

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  • Environmental Engineering in an International Context II

    Course No.
    CEE 4561
    Instructor
    M. L. Weber-Shirk
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The course connects the themes of culture, society, and water infrastructure in the context of the global south. The goal of the course is to offer students an experiential learning experience, working with AguaClara partner organizations and civil society organizations in emerging markets and economically disadvantaged communities. Students will learn about the challenges and opportunities of creating sustainable infrastructure, institutional networks, and technical backstopping for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Students synthesize the readings and their observations to develop a clearer understanding of the challenges of cross cultural collaboration designed to make the world a better place.

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  • Seminar: Project Management

    Course No.
    CEE 6091
    Instructor
    F. Vanek
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    Weekly seminar aimed at M.Eng students, in particular in the engineering management program.  Weekly speaker will come from different engineering applications and discuss insights into project management.  Seminar is non-participatory.

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  • Hispanic Theatre Production

    Course No.
    COML 3010 / LATA 3010 / LSP 3010
    Instructor
    D. Castillo
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Students develop a specific dramatic text for full-scale production. The course involves selection of an appropriate text, close analysis of the literary aspects of the play, and group evaluation of its representational value and effectiveness. All students in the course are involved in some aspects of production of the play, and write a final paper as a course requirement. Credit is variable depending upon the student’s role in play production: a minimum of 50 hours of work is required for 1 credit; a maximum of 3 credits are awarded for 100 hours or more of work.

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  • Writing and Producing the Narrative for Digital Media

    Course No.
    COMM 3010
    Instructor
    C. Byrne
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    New media communication has been blurring the traditional roles of content creator and consumer. Professional communicators—such as journalists, screenwriters, advertising executives, documentarians, and podcasters—are now expected to know how to use alternative storytelling forms to reach their audiences. They need to know how to gather information through a variety of sources such as crowdsurfing and social media; quickly and efficiently write, edit, and record audio and video. This course will explore these new delivery systems and provide guided practice of emerging communication forms. Fundamentally, this course is about writing—concisely and accurately with a clear and active voice—for new digital media with a focus on the personal narrative.

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  • Connecting Experience: Creating a Personal Brand and Implementing an ePortfolio

    Course No.
    COMM 3060
    Instructor
    C. Byrne
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course engages the student with his/her online presence. By committing to a daily video blog, an active and informative Twitter account, mastering the Skype interview, and creating and maintaining a robust ePortfolio, the student will embrace twenty-first century interpersonal media skills to leave a healthy digital footprint. A major component of the class is to improve the student’s oral communication skills through three personal branding assignments via video/digital presentation.

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  • Capstone Course in Environmental & Sustainability Communication: From the Lab to the World

    Course No.
    COMM 3080
    Instructor
    L. Chambliss, K. McComas, J. Schuldt
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This Capstone course in Environmental and Sustainability communication bridges students’ understanding of communication theory with a spring seminar and summer internship focused on the communication goals of our partner environmental organizations. Class meetings will involve a mix of lecture, readings, activities, case studies, and guest visits from local and national environmental organizations, focused on understanding and addressing communications challenges common to the field as well as those specific to individual organizations.

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  • Planning Communication Campaigns

    Course No.
    COMM 3760
    Instructor
    J. Niederdeppe, staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Provides a theoretical and practical overview of the audiences, messages, and evaluation of communication campaigns. The course considers common methods of data collection (e.g. in-depth interviews, surveys) and analysis of campaign-related data sources. Specific topics include: (1) campaign goals, objectives, strategies, and tactics; (2) research design and implementation; (3) audience segmentation; (4) message construction; and (5) techniques of evaluation.

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  • Community Involvement in Decision Making

    Course No.
    COMM 4560
    Instructor
    K. McComas
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Involving community members is an essential yet challenging part of decision making. Through readings, course activities, and analysis of case studies, this class will examine traditional and contemporary methods of community involvement in a variety of contexts. When evaluating the methods, the class will discuss and define criteria for success.

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  • Sci Comm Practicum: Developing Science Communication Tools

    Course No.
    COMM 5665
    Instructor
    L. Chambliss
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    In social science, science and technology fields, the ability to translate complex issues into compelling messages is an increasingly important career skill. Graduate students in STEM fields, especially, need practice developing user-friendly content to convey information to multiple audiences, including policymakers, newsmakers and the voting public. Effective communication requires knowledge of information dissemination, audience response, quality writing and presentation. In this course, science and technology students will receive hands-on practice developing several critical forms of information communication for nonscientists. Students will receive individualized attention, critique and editorial support. Creating an effective abstract, press release, writing for the Internet, using visual information and slide presentation will be covered. Students will use their own research – or research in their field – for all assignments. This 1-credit weekend workshop has significant out-of-class work, including readings and video viewing prior to the workshop, a one-on-one editorial review session and a revision of a class assignment after the session. This will allow students time to digest edits and comments by instructor and revise the material. Communicating about politically and socially sensitive topics will be addressed.

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  • Fieldwork in Urban Archaeology

    Course No.
    CRP 2610 / ARKEO 2610 / LA 2610
    Instructor
    S. Baugher
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Urban archaeologists study American Indian, colonial, and 19th-century sties that now lie within the boundaries of modern cities. The course explores how urban centers evolve, what lies beneath today’s cities, and how various cultures have altered the urban landscape. Students participate in a local, historical archaeological excavation.

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  • Land Use, Environmental Planning, and Urban Design Workshop

    Course No.
    CRP 3072 / CRP 5072
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Land Use and Environmental Planning workshop courses focus on the forces and actions that directly affect the physical character, transformation, rehabilitation, and preservation of natural landscapes, cities, and regions. Participants provide technical assistance to communities, and have the opportunity to work with communities in resolving critical planning issues. Topics may include development of land use and natural conservation plans, community redevelopment plans, design and analysis of public spaces, and strategies for making communities more environmentally and economically sustainable.

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  • Community Development Seminar

    Course No.
    CRP 3090 / DSOC 3090
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Introduction to the theory, method, and practice of contemporary community development. Topics include the role community-based organizations play in promoting sustainable development; enhancing the organizational capacity of community-based organizations; and the interplay between neighborhood-based community development activities and regional economic development policy-making.

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  • Regional Economic Impact Analysis

    Course No.
    CRP 3270
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course defines the context of a regional economy, taking a systems approach to sustainable development planning. Students will be introduced to the techniques of input-output analysis and will learn how to use social accounting models to evaluate social and environmental impacts. We will use international datasets and will also learn IMPLAN, a software and database designed to quantify the impact of exogenous forces on U.S. regions. Examples of exogenous forces include out-migration of population, natural disasters, financial flows, or the introduction of new activities. The course methods enable practicing professionals to integrate environmental and social dimensions of planning into the framework of economic impact analysis.

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  • Social Justice and the City: Preparation for Urban Fieldwork

    Course No.
    CRP 3310
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Land Use and Environmental Planning workshop courses focus on the forces and actions that directly affect the physical character, transformation, rehabilitation, and preservation of natural landscapes, cities, and regions. Topics of study include, among others, development of land use and natural conservation plans, design and implementation of “smart growth” policies, evaluation of infrastructure requirements, strategies for making cities more environmentally sustainable, design and analysis of public spaces, and strategies for increasing housing opportunities.

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  • Museum and the Public

    Course No.
    CRP 3601
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Evaluates different types of museums (art, science, history, arboreta, etc.), and their constantly evolving missions in contemporary societies. The material is addressed through site visits, lectures by faculty and guests, readings, case studies and a team semester-long project. Issues covered include the nature of collections; the audience; the purpose and role of museums; political and cultural questions about collecting, history and interpretation; governance and management. It also discusses the core ethical and intellectual values and positions implied or expressed by the institutions. Students will undertake a comprehensive planning project for a local museum, to be presented to the client at the end of the semester.

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  • Special Topics in Planning Methods

    Course No.
    CRP 3855
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This course addresses pertinent issues relative to the subject of planning methods. Topics vary each semester.

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  • Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    Course No.
    CRP 4080
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have revolutionized the way we manage, analyze, and present spatial information. This course focuses on GIS in the social sciences. Many of the exercises and examples are based on planning issues, but the concepts can be applied to many other disciplines such as government, economics, natural resources, and sociology. Some of the issues covered include fundamentals of spatial analysis; overview of GIS technology and applications; designing a GIS project; gathering and analyzing data; and creating thematic maps.

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  • Land Use, Environmental Planning, and Urban Design Workshop

    Course No.
    CRP 5072 / CRP 3072
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Land Use and Environmental Planning workshop courses focus on the forces and actions that directly affect the physical character, transformation, rehabilitation, and preservation of natural landscapes, cities, and regions. Participants provide technical assistance to communities, and have the opportunity to work with communities in resolving critical planning issues. Topics may include development of land use and natural conservation plans, community redevelopment plans, design and analysis of public spaces, and strategies for making communities more environmentally and economically sustainable.

    View full course description
  • Community Development Seminar

    Course No.
    CRP 5090 / DSOC 5090
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Introduction to the theory, method, and practice of contemporary community development. Topics include the role community-based organizations play in promoting sustainable development; enhancing the organizational capacity of community-based organizations; and the interplay between neighborhood-based community development activities and regional economic development policy-making.

    View full course description