Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Browse below or visit the registrar’s website to see what’s offered.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Cooperative Business Management

    Course No.
    AEM 2230
    Instructor
    T. M. Schmit
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    An evaluation of the fundamental principles, structure, finance, management and governance associated with the cooperative business model, with a focus on agricultural cooperatives. Analyses of the cooperative business organization within the modern economy are emphasized through a mix of lectures, guest speakers, case study discussions and, and experiential learning projects with cooperative businesses.

    Outcome 1: Identify economic justifications for the cooperative as a business entity.

    Outcome 2: Illustrate unique characteristics surrounding the governance, finance, and management of cooperative businesses.

    Outcome 3: Analyze contemporary issues facing modern cooperatives with an emphasis on challenges and opportunities facing cooperatives that compete with investor-owned firms.

     

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  • Impact Learning: Field Study Prep Experience

    Course No.
    AEM 3600
    Instructor
    D. Perosio, C. van Es
    Credits
    1.5
    Format
    Lecture

    The lectures/discussions will introduce you to the influence of race, gender, and culture on corporations, small businesses and entrepreneurial enterprises in South Africa. Cultural and historical background will be covered to promote transcultural understanding. During the course students will be introduced to their South African entrepreneurial partners with whom they will be working with prior to and during the study trip. In addition students will learn about the concept of human centered consulting which will better enable them to be more effective and impactful consultants.

    Outcome 1: Analyze social ventures, make practical and actionable recommendations to help social entrepreneurs.

    Outcome 2: Interact and communicate with people of other cultures and ethnicities, with a higher level of self-awareness of local contexts.

    Outcome 3: Analyze social ventures using a human centered consulting approach, and gain an understanding of the complexity of building a diverse society.

    Outcome 4: Explain how “big business” creates an inclusive and diverse workforce within South Africa.

    Outcome 5: Employ ethical reasoning in judging ideas, actions and their implications particularly when assisting small business owners.

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  • Impact Learning: Project Reflection, Completion and Presentation

    Course No.
    AEM 3601
    Instructor
    D. Perosio, C. van Es
    Credits
    1.5
    Format
    Lecture

    The seven week spring semester class will focus on reflection of winter trip and preparation and presentation of your South Africa project.

    Outcome 1: Analyze social ventures, make practical and actionable recommendations to help social entrepreneurs.

    Outcome 2: Interact and communicate with people of other cultures and ethnicities, with a higher level of self-awareness of local contexts.

    Outcome 3: Analyze social ventures using a human centered consulting approach, and gain an understanding of the complexity of building a diverse society.

    Outcome 4: Explain how “big business” creates an inclusive and diverse workforce within South Africa.

    Outcome 5: Employ ethical reasoning in judging ideas, actions and their implications particularly when assisting small business owners.

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  • Leadership for Sustainability

    Course No.
    ALS 2000
    Instructor
    K. Anderson, S. Brylinsky, K. Hilversum, M. Hoffman, A. Kohut, J. Mt. Pleasant
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is for students who are interested in becoming leaders for sustainability while on campus and throughout their lives. It is open to all levels. Students will focus primarily on sustainability issues in residence halls but opportunities to address similar issues across campus and/or in the community are also available. In the fall semester the focus is on reducing waste. During the spring semester emphasis is on reducing energy use and the risks associated with a changing climate. Students will increase their leadership and communication skills and better understand how to motivate themselves and others to change behaviors that will improve our stewardship of the world around us.

    Outcome 1: Demonstrate knowledge of climate change and the ways in which we can reduce our carbon footprint, especially through reduction in energy use (spring semester). Demonstrate knowledge of waste on campus and its environmental consequences (fall semester).

    Outcome 2: Identify and evaluate behaviors and practices that reduce waste and/or energy use.

    Outcome 3: Identify specific practices that can be used to motivate themselves and others to develop new behaviors and practices around waste reduction and energy use.

    Outcome 4: Identify critical elements of leadership; identify their individual leadership strengths and weaknesses; practice new leadership skills.

    Outcome 5: Demonstrate knowledge of Community-Based Social Marketing and use it change their own and others’ behaviors to increase campus sustainability.

    Outcome 6: Describe how social-economic class, ethnicity, gender, and race affect perspectives toward sustainability.

    Outcome 7: Identify and use skills to work effectively in teams.

    Outcome 8: Find credible information on issues related to waste reduction, energy use, and climate change, and the connection to sustainability.

    Outcome 9: Demonstrate project management, peer-education, and assessment skills by implementing projects.

    Outcome 10: Demonstrate improved communication skills about controversial sustainability issues.

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  • Greek Leadership Academy

    Course No.
    ALS 2020
    Instructor
    M. Eames-Sheavly, A. Kohut
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    Cornell’s Fraternity and Sorority system is in a dynamic period in its lifespan, and will continue to undergo shifts and adjust to changes over the next few years. It is critical that leaders of these organizations have the skills necessary to lead in ways that will help chapters continue to thrive. This course is specifically designed to meet the needs of existing and incoming leaders in Cornell’s Fraternity and Sorority system. You will look critically at your own leadership skills and conclude the course with an action plan that will prepare you for January’s recruitment and new member period. In this unique one-credit course you will build your leadership skills while building connections and relationships with officers in other chapters.

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  • Community Engagement, Climate Change in the Mekong Delta: Insights into Vietnam

    Course No.
    ALS 3600 / ASIAN 3360
    Instructor
    T. Tranviet
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The combination of seminar and international service-learning course provides a unique opportunity to connect classroom instruction with experiential learning while gaining a broad understanding of the impacts resulting from climate change. In addition, the course includes background on Vietnamese history and culture. A two-week field trip in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam offers students opportunity to experience firsthand the dire situation in the region and gain a deeper and more personalized understanding of these pressing issues due to a rapidly changing climate.

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  • Understanding Global Capitalism Through Service Learning

    Course No.
    AMST 2016 / ASRC 2006 / HIST 2006
    Instructor
    E. Baptist
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is a seminar focused on a service-learning approach to understanding the history of neoliberal transformations of the global economy through the lens of an island (Jamaica) and a community (Petersfield.) Building on the success of last year’s global service-learning course and trip to Petersfield, and now bringing the course under the auspices of both the Engaged Cornell and Cornell Abroad administrative and funding capabilities. Students will attend class each week and will also take a one-week service trip over spring break to work with the local community partner (AOC) in Petersfield. We will also work with Amizade, a non-profit based in Pittsburgh, who is the well-established partner of the AOC and which works with numerous universities on global service learning projects.

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  • Global Capitalism in One Community

    Course No.
    AMST 2017 / ASRC 2007 / HIST 2007
    Instructor
    E. Baptist
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will learn about the history and culture of one Jamaican community and its changing historical relationship to the world economy through a three-week trip to Petersfield Jamaica. While there, they will attend class sessions, participate in service activities determined by the community, study local sugar production and labor and their relationship to the global economy on the ground, and conduct oral history interviews with local residents. They will live in homestays, work closely with a local community partner, attend community self-governance meetings, and the oral history texts they generate will be curated for a local archive. This course will be structured according to the principles of fair trade service learning.

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  • Immigrant Ithaca

    Course No.
    AMST 2252 / HIST 2252 / LSP 2252
    Instructor
    M. C. Garcia
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This engaged learning course allows students to combine community service with academic learning. Students will learn about the post-1965 immigration to the United States, and especially to Ithaca and upstate New York. We will examine the reasons for migration, the policies that facilitated entry, and the particular needs of immigrant populations in the local setting. Because this course is a seminar there is a strong emphasis on the discussion of the weekly readings, and class participation weighs heavily in the assessment of the final grade. A key component of this course is the community service project. In consultation with the professor, students will identify and work on individual service projects in the local community and must agree to commit a minimum of 3-4 hours per week to their project. In the past, students have worked with a number of local organizations including the Immigrant Services Program at Catholic Charities; the Tompkins County Living Wage Coalition & Workers’ Rights Center; the BOCES ESL Program; the Translator Program; and the Cornell Friends of the Farmworkers.

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  • Race and Social Entrepreneurship: Food Justice and Urban Reform

    Course No.
    AMST 4033 / ASRC 4330
    Instructor
    N. Rooks
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This seminar examines the issue of food justice in Ithaca and surrounding areas and explores innovative approaches for bringing about social equity and justice in relation to food availability, access and sustainability for those on a fixed or low income.  Working in concert with community stake holders and drawing on theoretical and historical scholarship, students will work with local farmers, non-profits and community activists to learn about area organizations and experiments that have sought to make interventions. The seminar will also offer students the opportunity to conduct hands-on research in order to propose workable approaches to solving food justice issues and problems.  Our central purpose will be to understand the conditions under which attempts to move from critique to sustainable solutions succeed and fail and to look at efforts to achieve sustainable development in the context of racism and social inequality with a focus on contemporary and historical efforts to build lasting institutions or movements.

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  • Dairy Herd Management

    Course No.
    ANSC 3510
    Instructor
    J. Giordano
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Course integrates concepts of cow biology, management, economics, and sustainability of dairy operations. Special emphasis is given to management practices and technologies that affect cattle health and well-being, milk production and quality, reproduction, herd growth, milking, and environmental impact of dairy production. Basic concepts of dairy foods processing and the importance of milk quality for dairy products are covered. Laboratory sessions include hands-on learning of dairy software, analysis of alternative strategies, and decision-making. Commercial farm case studies are used to integrate concepts of biology and management learned in the course.

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  • Junior Dairy Fellows

    Course No.
    ANSC 3511
    Instructor
    B. Nguyen, M. Van Amburgh
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Designed for undergraduates who have a sincere interest in dairy production management and the dairy industry. The objective of this course is to impart further understanding of the integration and application of dairy science to dairy production enterprises and related industries. The course emphasizes a wide range of dairy- and agriculture- related businesses and personnel that work with the dairy industry worldwide.

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  • Dairy Herd Business Management

    Course No.
    ANSC 4510
    Instructor
    J. Karszes, M. Van Amburgh
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Emphasizes dairy herd business management with application to herd management analysis. Laboratory includes farm tours and analysis.

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  • Dairy Management Fellowship

    Course No.
    ANSC 4560
    Instructor
    M. Van Amburgh
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Designed for undergraduates who have a sincere interest in dairy farm management. The course objective is to gain further understanding of the integration and application of dairy farm management principles and programs with respect to progressive dairying and related industries. There are field trips focusing on dairy farm business analyses and feedback, along with other experiential learning activities and professional development and networking opportunities. Field trips will be held on announced Saturdays throughout the course of the semester.

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  • Global Engagements: Living and Working in a Diverse World

    Course No.
    ANTHR 1900
    Instructor
    H. Kantor
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The path to global citizenship begins with a facility for navigating cultural difference. How might we engage with communities, whether here in Ithaca or across the globe, whose pasts and present understandings are fundamentally different than our own? This course is designed to help students bring global engaged learning into their Cornell education. It introduces skills that are vital for intercultural engagement, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and the habits of critical reflexivity. Students will complete projects with service learning placements in the Ithaca community. They will also begin an ePortfolio as they explore their identity and engage with the international community on campus.

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  • Going Global: Preparing for Engaged Learning

    Course No.
    ANTHR 3901
    Instructor
    H. Kantor
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    So you’re enrolled in an upcoming study abroad program! Now what? How can you make the most of your experience? This half-semester course is designed to prepare students departing for any study abroad or domestic engaged learning programs. This course provides the opportunity to refine the skills necessary for cross-cultural encounters, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and the habits of critical reflexivity. Students will research the culture and history of their destination and develop an ePortfolio to capture their experiences. They will also consider how to succeed in a foreign academic environment by engaging with the international community on campus.

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  • Coming Home: Making the Most of Engaged Experiences

    Course No.
    ANTHR 3902
    Instructor
    H. Kantor
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    How has your study abroad experience shaped you and your perspective on the world? What does it mean to be a global citizen? This half-semester course is designed for students returning from study abroad or other engaged learning programs. Students will reflect on topics such as identity, difference, and navigating cross-cultural encounters by writing narratives based on their experience and revising their ePortfolio. In doing so, they will grapple with “culture shock” and share moments of personal growth. They will also have the opportunity to contribute to the international community on campus.

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  • Professional Practice and the World of Medicine

    Course No.
    ANTHR 4902 / HE 4902
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    By implementing ethnographic methods students in the Urban Semester Program surface medical culture in their rotations and presence in hospital environments.  These methods include historical analysis, oral history, participant observation, participatory methods, formal and informal interviews, and additional mechanisms to generate data.  The focus of their exploration is based on disparities in health and medicine. By the end of the semester, students investigate the nature of medical professional practice by carrying out library research, observations, and informal interviews with medical practitioners in both New York Presbyterian and Woodhull hospitals.  In this course students extend their capacity for self-direction and produce their own ethnography of medical practice.  This may be an examination of medical culture, or the culture of a particular specialization, or an exploration of a particular topic in social medicine or public health.

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  • Professional Practice and Leadership

    Course No.
    ANTHR 4923 / HE 4923
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    In this course, students examine the nature of service as integral to all forms of practice, whether in a professional career, in community leadership roles, or in personal life.  In this course service is a way of being in practice in all parts of life, rather than a community activity or act of charity seen as adjunct to “real life work.” Service is practiced in a multiplicity of contexts: in the corporate sector, in the non-profit sector, in legal or social services, through nutrition programs or in community organizations.  Social responsibility in and through work has become an essential part of professional practice and leadership in the 21st century. Through readings, seminar discussions and weekly reflection papers, as well as guest speakers from a variety of professions, students explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices as these relate to service in their future careers and leadership roles.

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  • Fieldwork in Urban Archaeology

    Course No.
    ARKEO 2610 / CRP 2610 / LA 2610
    Instructor
    S. Baugher
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Urban archaeologists study American Indian, colonial, and 19th-century sties that now lie within the boundaries of modern cities. The course explores how urban centers evolve, what lies beneath today’s cities, and how various cultures have altered the urban landscape. Students participate in a local, historical archaeological excavation.

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  • Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology

    Course No.
    ARKEO 2620 / LA 2620
    Instructor
    S. Baugher
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.

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  • Community Engagement and Climate Change in the Mekong Delta: Insights into Vietnam

    Course No.
    ASIAN 3360
    Instructor
    T. Tranviet
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This service-based, interdisciplinary course aims to introduce students to contemporary Vietnam through a lens of climate change with a special emphasis on community engagement to enrich their international learning experience. In the fall, students will take VIET 1100 as a pre-requisite course to receive background in Vietnamese language, culture and history. A three-week field trip to Vietnam takes place during the winter session. While in the country, students will engage in service learning activities in local communities in the Mekong River Delta in Southern Vietnam, one of the areas most affected by climate change in the world, to learn firsthand the dire situation in the region. Students will have lectures from scientists and climate change experts to gain a broad knowledge on impacts due to climate change. There will be opportunities to meet with local government officials, residents, and farmers to learn about their adaption measures concerning these issues. The service learning component is essential in providing students meaningful interactions with the local people in the Mekong Delta to understand and have empathy for their plights, and gain insights into their everyday life. This course may also provide the basis for the possibility of collaborative research and study exchange between Cornell University and Vietnam in the future. (SC)

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  • The Underground Railroad Seminar

    Course No.
    ASRC 1996
    Instructor
    A. T. Miller
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    This seminar and its accompanying immersion offer undergraduates the unique opportunity to explore the abolition movement of upstate New York. This course provides an introductory examination of antebellum slavery and its abolition in the United States, including slave resistance, emancipation, reconstruction and effects of U.S. slavery on current social contexts. Students will also explore modern day slavery, forced labor, and contemporary abolition/resistance movements. Course participants will create a curriculum to be proposed to the Ithaca City School District for future undergraduate students to teach and learn with local youth about the area’s Underground Railroad and community advocacy and activism. The weekend immersion trips offer an experiential learning opportunity as participants retrace routes of the local Underground Railroad and abolition movement through several cities in upstate New York and Southern Ontario, Canada. This seminar and corresponding travel are offered by Cornell’s Office of Academic Diversity Initiatives, Engaged Learning & Research and Public Service Center.

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  • Understanding Global Capitalism Through Service Learning

    Course No.
    ASRC 2006 / AMST 2016 / HIST 2006
    Instructor
    E. Baptist
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course is a seminar focused on a service-learning approach to understanding the history of neoliberal transformations of the global economy through the lens of an island (Jamaica) and a community (Petersfield.) Building on the success of last year’s global service-learning course and trip to Petersfield, and now bringing the course under the auspices of both the Engaged Cornell and Cornell Abroad administrative and funding capabilities. Students will attend class each week and will also take a one-week service trip over spring break to work with the local community partner (AOC) in Petersfield. We will also work with Amizade, a non-profit based in Pittsburgh, who is the well-established partner of the AOC and which works with numerous universities on global service learning projects.

    View full course description
  • Global Capitalism in One Community

    Course No.
    ASRC 2007 / AMST 2017 / HIST 2007
    Instructor
    E. Baptist
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Students will learn about the history and culture of one Jamaican community and its changing historical relationship to the world economy through a three-week trip to Petersfield Jamaica. While there, they will attend class sessions, participate in service activities determined by the community, study local sugar production and labor and their relationship to the global economy on the ground, and conduct oral history interviews with local residents. They will live in homestays, work closely with a local community partner, attend community self-governance meetings, and the oral history texts they generate will be curated for a local archive. This course will be structured according to the principles of fair trade service learning.

    View full course description
  • Race and Social Entrepreneurship: Food Justice and Urban Reform

    Course No.
    ASRC 4330 / AMST 4033
    Instructor
    N. Rooks
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    This seminar examines the issue of food justice in Ithaca and surrounding areas and explores innovative approaches for bringing about social equity and justice in relation to food availability, access and sustainability for those on a fixed or low income.  Working in concert with community stake holders and drawing on theoretical and historical scholarship, students will work with local farmers, non-profits and community activists to learn about area organizations and experiments that have sought to make interventions. The seminar will also offer students the opportunity to conduct hands-on research in order to propose workable approaches to solving food justice issues and problems.  Our central purpose will be to understand the conditions under which attempts to move from critique to sustainable solutions succeed and fail and to look at efforts to achieve sustainable development in the context of racism and social inequality with a focus on contemporary and historical efforts to build lasting institutions or movements.

    View full course description
  • Engineers Without Borders Independent Study

    Course No.
    BEE 4971
    Instructor
    P. G. Hess
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    The course content must relate directly to goals of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) and can be taken for 1 to 4 credits under supervision of a College of Engineering faculty member with approval of the EWB faculty advisor (Currently P. G. Hess). Internships can consist of on- or off-campus research or work experiences. The independent study should be purposeful, provide opportunities for reflection, present a continual challenge to the student, and incorporate active learning. The student is expected to be an active participant in all stages of the experience from planning to evaluation. Students taking this course must be members of Cornell EWB.

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  • Conservation Oceanography

    Course No.
    BIOEE 3510 / EAS 3510
    Instructor
    C. Greene, D. Harvell
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Focuses on field methods used to study marine organisms and ecosystems in efforts to sustain them in the face of many environmental challenges. Introduces students to modern techniques of marine-ecosystems research, including bioacoustics, ecological survey methods, and experimental marine ecology. This course is field and laboratory intensive with students engaged in hands-on, active learning that takes advantage of local resources.

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  • Special Topics in Ocean Biodiversity: Ocean Biodiversity Research Apprenticeship

    Course No.
    BIOEE 4920
    Instructor
    D. Harvell
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The research apprenticeship aims to teach students critical hands-on research skills and team-building in a closely mentored environment. This research apprenticeship in a field marine setting will be based at Friday Harbor Laboratories in the San Juan Islands, Washington. Research-intensive field work provides students with a life-changing experience that cannot be replicated in even the best university laboratory, and that is especially true for Cornell students interested in ocean and marine life. The project planned is Climate Change and Health of Seagrass. It will involve field research to survey health of a range of the rich, but declining sea grass beds around the San Juans. Students will test the general hypothesis that a pathogen, Labyrinthula zosterae, is part of the cause of the decline. Students will bring samples back to the lab and learn methods of assaying health of blades and isolating the causative microorganism. They will perform PCR tests to identify the L zosterae and perform a test of Koch’s postulates. They will have an opportunity to run experiments in Friday Harbor’s Ocean Acidification Center. They will use the R statistics package to analyze their data and craft it into a paper. This project has been developed to date with graduate students over the last 6 summers at Friday Harbor Labs and with NSF funding and is now sufficiently developed to be productive for undergraduate research. The research apprenticeship course will be supported by 2 additional courses that will teach the biota of the San Juan islands and ecology of sea grass beds.

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  • Biology Study Group Leader Training and Teaching Experience

    Course No.
    BIOG 4981
    Instructor
    A. MacNeill
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Course offers training and experience for undergraduate study group leaders (SGLs) in the biology core courses. SGLs will meet weekly for training in collaborative, student-centered, active learning methods, facilitated by trainers from the Cornell Learning Strategies Center. SGLs will also facilitate one or two weekly study group meetings. SGLs will help study group members learn how to identify and analyze concepts presented in the associated courses, and learn how to analyze and answer questions on exams, quizzes, problem sets, worksheets, and other course materials. SGLs will be evaluated on their participation in weekly training meetings, observations of their study group meetings, mid-semester and end-of-semester evaluations, and written work, including weekly lesson plans, +–? evaluation sheets, and end-of-semester reports. 

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