Courses

In community-engaged courses, students go beyond the classroom to connect theory and practice. They collaborate with communities — in Ithaca and around the globe — to design, implement and evaluate real solutions to real problems. These rigorous courses are as dynamic as their fields of study and challenge students to grow as global citizens.

Below are community-engaged courses offered during fall 2017. See the full list of community-engaged courses on the University Registrar website.

Course Listing

  • Title
  • Course No.
  • Greek Leadership Academy

    Course No.
    ALS 2020
    Instructor
    M. Brooks, M. Eames-Sheavly, K. Hilversum, A. Kohut
    Credits
    1
    Format
    Lecture

    Cornell’s Fraternity and Sorority system is in a dynamic period in its lifespan, and will continue to undergo shifts and adjust to changes over the next few years. It is critical that leaders of these organizations have the skills necessary to lead in ways that will help chapters continue to thrive. This course is specifically designed to meet the needs of existing and incoming leaders in Cornell’s Fraternity and Sorority system. You will look critically at your own leadership skills and conclude the course with an action plan that will prepare you for January’s recruitment and new member period. In this unique one-credit course you will build your leadership skills while building connections and relationships with officers in other chapters.

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  • Dairy Herd Business Management

    Course No.
    ANSC 4510
    Instructor
    J. Karszes, M. Van Amburgh
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture and Lab

    Emphasizes dairy herd business management with application to herd management analysis. Laboratory includes farm tours and analysis.

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  • Global Engagements: Living and Working in a Diverse World

    Course No.
    ANTHR 1900
    Instructor
    H. Kantor
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture and Discussion

    The path to global citizenship begins with a facility for navigating cultural difference. How might we engage with communities, whether here in Ithaca or across the globe, whose pasts and present understandings are fundamentally different than our own? This course is designed to help students bring global engaged learning into their Cornell education. It introduces skills that are vital for intercultural engagement, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and the habits of critical reflexivity. Students will complete projects with service learning placements in the Ithaca community. They will also begin an ePortfolio as they explore their identity and engage with the international community on campus. aca community.

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  • Going Global: Preparing for Engaged Learning

    Course No.
    ANTHR 3901
    Instructor
    H. Kantor
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture and Discussion

    So you’re enrolled in an upcoming study abroad program! Now what? How can you make the most of your experience? This half-semester course is designed to prepare students departing for any study abroad or domestic engaged learning programs. This course provides the opportunity to refine the skills necessary for cross-cultural encounters, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and the habits of critical reflexivity. Students will research the culture and history of their destination and develop an ePortfolio to capture their experiences. They will also consider how to succeed in a foreign academic environment by engaging with the international community on campus.

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  • Coming Home: Making the Most of Engaged Experiences

    Course No.
    ANTHR 3902
    Instructor
    H. Kantor
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture and Discussion

    How has your study abroad experience shaped you and your perspective on the world? What does it mean to be a global citizen? This half-semester course is designed for students returning from study abroad or other engaged learning programs. Students will reflect on topics such as identity, difference, and navigating cross-cultural encounters by writing narratives based on their experience and revising their ePortfolio. In doing so, they will grapple with “culture shock” and share moments of personal growth. They will also have the opportunity to contribute to the international community on campus.

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  • Professional Practice and the World of Medicine

    Course No.
    ANTHR 4902 / HE 4902
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    By implementing ethnographic methods students in the Urban Semester Program surface medical culture in their rotations and presence in hospital environments.  These methods include historical analysis, oral history, participant observation, participatory methods, formal and informal interviews, and additional mechanisms to generate data.  The focus of their exploration is based on disparities in health and medicine. By the end of the semester, students investigate the nature of medical professional practice by carrying out library research, observations, and informal interviews with medical practitioners in both New York Presbyterian and Woodhull hospitals.  In this course students extend their capacity for self-direction and produce their own ethnography of medical practice.  This may be an examination of medical culture, or the culture of a particular specialization, or an exploration of a particular topic in social medicine or public health.

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  • Professional Practice and Leadership

    Course No.
    ANTHR 4923 / HE 4923
    Instructor
    S. Beck
    Credits
    5
    Format
    Lecture

    In this course, students examine the nature of service as integral to all forms of practice, whether in a professional career, in community leadership roles, or in personal life.  In this course service is a way of being in practice in all parts of life, rather than a community activity or act of charity seen as adjunct to “real life work.” Service is practiced in a multiplicity of contexts: in the corporate sector, in the non-profit sector, in legal or social services, through nutrition programs or in community organizations.  Social responsibility in and through work has become an essential part of professional practice and leadership in the 21st century. Through readings, seminar discussions and weekly reflection papers, as well as guest speakers from a variety of professions, students explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices as these relate to service in their future careers and leadership roles.

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  • Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology

    Course No.
    ARKEO 2620 / LA 2620
    Instructor
    S. Baugher
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.

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  • The Underground Railroad Seminar

    Course No.
    ASRC 1996
    Instructor
    G. Aching
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Seminar

    This seminar and its accompanying immersion offer undergraduates the unique opportunity to explore the abolition movement of upstate New York. This course provides an introductory examination of antebellum slavery and its abolition in the United States, including slave resistance, emancipation, reconstruction and effects of U.S. slavery on current social contexts. Students will also explore modern day slavery, forced labor, and contemporary abolition/resistance movements. Course participants will create a curriculum to be proposed to the Ithaca City School District for future undergraduate students to teach and learn with local youth about the area’s Underground Railroad and community advocacy and activism. The weekend immersion trips offer an experiential learning opportunity as participants retrace routes of the local Underground Railroad and abolition movement through several cities in upstate New York and Southern Ontario, Canada. This seminar and corresponding travel are offered by Cornell’s Office of Academic Diversity Initiatives, Engaged Learning & Research and Public Service Center.

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  • Engineers Without Borders Independent Study

    Course No.
    BEE 4971
    Instructor
    P. Hess
    Credits
    1-4
    Format
    Independent Study

    The course content must relate directly to goals of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) and can be taken for 1 to 4 credits under supervision of a College of Engineering faculty member with approval of the EWB faculty advisor (Currently P. G. Hess). Internships can consist of on- or off-campus research or work experiences. The independent study should be purposeful, provide opportunities for reflection, present a continual challenge to the student, and incorporate active learning. The student is expected to be an active participant in all stages of the experience from planning to evaluation. Students taking this course must be members of Cornell EWB.

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  • Biology Study Group Leader Training and Teaching Experience

    Course No.
    BIOG 4981
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    1-2
    Format
    TA/Tutor Group

    Course offers training and experience for undergraduate study group leaders (SGLs) in the biology core courses. SGLs will meet weekly for training in collaborative, student-centered, active learning methods, facilitated by trainers from the Cornell Learning Strategies Center. SGLs will also facilitate one or two weekly study group meetings. SGLs will help study group members learn how to identify and analyze concepts presented in the associated courses, and learn how to analyze and answer questions on exams, quizzes, problem sets, worksheets, and other course materials. SGLs will be evaluated on their participation in weekly training meetings, observations of their study group meetings, mid-semester and end-of-semester evaluations, and written work, including weekly lesson plans, +–? evaluation sheets, and end-of-semester reports.

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  • Biology Senior Study Group Leader Training and Teaching Experience

    Course No.
    BIOG 4982
    Instructor
    Staff
    Credits
    2
    Format
    TA/Tutor Group

    Course offers training and experience as undergraduate senior study group leaders (senior SGLs) in the biology core courses. Senior SGLs will meet weekly for training in collaborative, student-centered, active learning methods, facilitated by trainers from the Cornell Learning Strategies Center. Senior SGLs will facilitate one weekly study group meeting. Senior SGLs will also help train, observe, and mentor study group leaders. Senior SGLs will also provide office hour tutoring at the Biology Learning Strategies Center, and assist with some administrative functions. Senior SGLs will be evaluated on their participation in weekly training meetings, their mentoring and observations of SGLs, mid-semester and end-of-semester evaluations, and written work, including weekly lesson plans, +–? evaluation sheets, and end-of-semester reports.

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  • Clinical Preceptorship for Biomedical Engineers

    Course No.
    BME 5100
    Instructor
    N. de Faria, P. Doerschuk
    Credits
    2
    Format
    Lecture

    Preceptorship, is a well-known process in healthcare education and described as a short term relationship between a student as novice and an experienced health care professional, who provides individual attention to the student’s learning needs within a clinical environment. The BME 5100 leverages this methodology and enable our students to experience the dynamics of a clinical environment, observe the routine practice of a clinician, identify potential needs, and through a formal process evaluate the merits and provide ideas on how to address these perceived needs. The instructor will educate the students about the clinical environment, dress and behavior code, interaction with hospital staff and patients, as well as monitor and manage each student-preceptor team. The instructor and other engineering faculty will also review the student’s experiences and assist in any assignments the preceptor may have given to the student. The preceptor will guide the student with in depth knowledge of the related anatomy, physiology and pathology associated with his specialty. The preceptor will also provide the student the ability to participate and observe as well as generate weekly assignments. The sponsoring institution and the preceptors are very interested in the identified problems, the ideas resultant of the process, and how these ideas could be addressed by applying principles of engineering. The student will provide feedback in the form of a final report as well as an on-site poster presentation at the end of the academic year. The merited ideas will be placed in the pipeline for the sponsored design projects (BME 5910, BME 5920).

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  • Immersion Experience in Medical Research and Clinical Practice

    Course No.
    BME 7160
    Instructor
    Y. Wang
    Credits
    6
    Format
    Lecture

    Summer immersion at Weill Medical College. Students participate in lectures, rounds, and seminars; observe surgeries; and solve medical problems presented by the staff.

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  • AguaClara: Sustainable Water Supply Project

    Course No.
    CEE 2550 / CEE 4550
    Instructor
    M. Weber-Shirk
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture and Lab

    Student teams conduct research, build working models, design full-scale prototypes, create design algorithms, and create educational materials for technology transfer to improve drinking water quality in the Global South. Students in CEE 2550 learn in an apprenticeship role on teams led by students in CEE 4550 or CEE 5051/CEE 5052. For more information, see aguaclara.cee.cornell.edu.

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  • Special Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Course No.
    CEE 3090
    Instructor
    M. Weber-Shirk, F. Vanek, R. Richardson, K. Hover, J. Abel, B. Philpot, M. Grigoriu, G. McLaskey
    Credits
    1-6
    Format
    Independent Study

    Supervised study by individuals or groups of upper-division students on an undergraduate project or on specialized topics not covered in regular courses. .

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  • AguaClara: Sustainable Water Supply Project

    Course No.
    CEE 4550 / CEE 2550
    Instructor
    M. Weber-Shirk
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture and Lab

    Student teams conduct research, build working models, design full-scale prototypes, create design algorithms, and create educational materials for technology transfer to improve drinking water quality in the Global South. For more information see aguaclara.cee.cornell.edu.

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  • Environmental Engineering in an International Context I

    Course No.
    CEE 4560
    Instructor
    M. Weber-Shirk
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    The course connects the themes of culture, society, and water infrastructure in the context of the global south. The goal of the course is to offer students an experiential learning experience, working with AguaClara partner organizations and civil society organizations in emerging markets and economically disadvantaged communities. Students will learn about the challenges and opportunities of creating sustainable infrastructure, institutional networks, and technical backstopping for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Students will read about development theory and the social, political, and historical context of Honduras. During the January intersession students travel to Honduras for an intensive engineering in context experience.

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  • Writing and Producing the Narrative for Digital Media

    Course No.
    COMM 3010
    Instructor
    C. Byrne
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    New media communication has been blurring the traditional roles of content creator and consumer. Professional communicators—such as journalists, screenwriters, advertising executives, documentarians, and podcasters—are now expected to know how to use alternative storytelling forms to reach their audiences. They need to know how to gather information through a variety of sources such as crowdsurfing and social media; quickly and efficiently write, edit, and record audio and video. This course will explore these new delivery systems and provide guided practice of emerging communication forms. Fundamentally, this course is about writing—concisely and accurately with a clear and active voice—for new digital media with a focus on the personal narrative.

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  • Connecting Experience: Creating a Personal Brand and Implementing an ePortfolio

    Course No.
    COMM 3060
    Instructor
    C. Byrne
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    This course engages the student with his/her online presence. By committing to a daily video blog, an active and informative Twitter account, mastering the Skype interview, and creating and maintaining a robust ePortfolio, the student will embrace twenty-first century interpersonal media skills to leave a healthy digital footprint. A major component of the class is to improve the student’s oral communication skills through three personal branding assignments via video/digital presentation.

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  • Planning Communication Campaigns

    Course No.
    COMM 3760
    Instructor
    J. Niederdeppe
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Provides a theoretical and practical overview of the audiences, messages, and evaluation of communication campaigns. The course considers common methods of data collection (e.g. in-depth interviews, surveys) and analysis of campaign-related data sources. Specific topics include: (1) campaign goals, objectives, strategies, and tactics; (2) research design and implementation; (3) audience segmentation; (4) message construction; and (5) techniques of evaluation.

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  • Land Use, Environmental Planning, and Urban Design Workshop

    Course No.
    CRP 3072 / CRP 5072
    Instructor
    G. Frantz
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Field Studies

    Land Use and Environmental Planning workshop courses focus on the forces and actions that directly affect the physical character, transformation, rehabilitation, and preservation of natural landscapes, cities, and regions. Participants provide technical assistance to communities, and have the opportunity to work with communities in resolving critical planning issues. Topics may include development of land use and natural conservation plans, community redevelopment plans, design and analysis of public spaces, and strategies for making communities more environmentally and economically sustainable.

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  • Special Topics in Planning Methods

    Course No.
    CRP 3855
    Instructor
    N. Kudva
    Credits
    1-4
    Format
    Field Studies

    This course addresses pertinent issues relative to the subject of planning methods. Topics vary each semester.

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  • Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    Course No.
    CRP 4080
    Instructor
    S. Goldstein
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have revolutionized the way we manage, analyze, and present spatial information. This course focuses on GIS in the social sciences. Many of the exercises and examples are based on planning issues, but the concepts can be applied to many other disciplines such as government, economics, natural resources, and sociology. Some of the issues covered include fundamentals of spatial analysis; overview of GIS technology and applications; designing a GIS project; gathering and analyzing data; and creating thematic maps.

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  • Land Use, Environmental Planning, and Urban Design Workshop

    Course No.
    CRP 5072 / CRP 3072
    Instructor
    G. Frantz
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Field Studies

    Land Use and Environmental Planning workshop courses focus on the forces and actions that directly affect the physical character, transformation, rehabilitation, and preservation of natural landscapes, cities, and regions. Participants provide technical assistance to communities, and have the opportunity to work with communities in resolving critical planning issues. Topics may include development of land use and natural conservation plans, community redevelopment plans, design and analysis of public spaces, and strategies for making communities more environmentally and economically sustainable.

    View full course description
  • Healthy Places: Design, Planning and Public Health

    Course No.
    DEA 2700
    Instructor
    N. Wells
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    Drawing from public health, environmental psychology, design, urban planning , architecture and landscape architecture, we examine how the physical environment influences health and health behaviors. We consider various contexts from rooms and buildings to parks and cities. Outcomes include physical and mental health, diet, physical activity and obesity.

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  • Problem-Seeking through Programming

    Course No.
    DEA 3590 / DEA 6500
    Instructor
    L. Maxwell
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Lecture

    An architectural program is used to define the design problem, guide the design process and evaluate design solutions.  Students will develop skills in preparing a program while keeping in mind the potential audiences.  This course emphasizes the role of social science research and environment – behavior interaction in facility planning and in the design process.

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  • Adaptive Reuse Studio: Recycling the Built Environment

    Course No.
    DEA 4401
    Instructor
    R. Gilmore
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Studio

    Economic forces have created the need for the adaptive reuse of existing structures vs new construction throughout the built environment.  Utilizing sustainable principles and the LEED rating system, this comprehensive studio challenges students to complete all phases of a historic preservation project using an historic structure in the region.  Site visits for building assessments, professional practice tutorials, and seminars on preservation enable students to develop a holistic understanding of how a building thinks and learns over time.

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  • Policy Meets Design: High-Impact Facilities of the 21st Century

    Course No.
    DEA 4500
    Instructor
    R. Zadeh
    Credits
    3
    Format
    Seminar

    Active participation from industry leaders including design firms and healthcare providers, students examine how optimized design and policy empower people, organizations, and communities to achieve their health-related operational and business objectives.  Students apply the lessons from high-impact healthcare facilities to their specific area of interest (e.g. senior living, healthcare, hospitality, education, housing, landscape, and urban planning).

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  • Problem-Seeking through Programming

    Course No.
    DEA 6500 / DEA 3590
    Instructor
    L. Maxwell
    Credits
    4
    Format
    Lecture

    Each student is required to attend DEA 3590 lectures, complete all required readings and assignments, and meet with the instructor and with other graduate students. An additional programming project is required for all graduate students.

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